JOHN SCHOLL | EXCEPTIONAL CELEBRATION WHIMSY
JOHN SCHOLL | EXCEPTIONAL CELEBRATION WHIMSY
JOHN SCHOLL | EXCEPTIONAL CELEBRATION WHIMSY
JOHN SCHOLL | EXCEPTIONAL CELEBRATION WHIMSY
JOHN SCHOLL | EXCEPTIONAL CELEBRATION WHIMSY
JOHN SCHOLL | EXCEPTIONAL CELEBRATION WHIMSY
JOHN SCHOLL | EXCEPTIONAL CELEBRATION WHIMSY
1412

JOHN SCHOLL | EXCEPTIONAL CELEBRATION WHIMSY

Estimate: 60,000 - 80,000 USD

JOHN SCHOLL | EXCEPTIONAL CELEBRATION WHIMSY

Estimate: 60,000 - 80,000 USD

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Lot Details

Description

JOHN SCHOLL

EXCEPTIONAL CELEBRATION WHIMSY

1827-1916

GERMANIA, PENNSYLVANIA, CIRCA 1910


Height 89 in. by Width 28 in. by Depth 23 in.

Condition Report

To request a condition report for this lot, please contact Americana@sothebys.com.

Cataloguing

Provenance

Adele Earnest and Cordelia Hamilton, Stony Point, New York;

Tim and Pam Hill, Birmingham, Michigan;

Stephen Score, Boston, Massachusetts.

Exhibited

The Willard Gallery, New York, 1967.

Literature

Adele Earnest, Folk Art in America, A Personal View (Exton: Schiffer Publishing, 1984), p. 119, illus. in black and white;

Frank Maresca, Roger Ricco and Margit Rowell, American Vernacular (New York: Bullfinch Press, 2002), p. 230, illus. in color.

Catalogue Note

The German-born John Scholl (1827- 1916), emigrated to Schuykill County, Pennsylvania in 1853. By 1870, he had settled his family in the town of Germania, Pennsylvania where he was both a farmer and a carpenter. During his lifetime, he had helped to build much of the town, including the St. Matthieus Lutheran Church, a general store and the local brewery.


When he retired from his trade at the age of eighty, his work was far from over. Having worked for over sixty years, he found it difficult to live an idle life and thus began to create his own art. He created small whittler’s puzzles, known as “Finials,” openwork wall plaques representing snowflakes, mechanized wooden toys, and large, freestanding sculptures, later dubbed as “Celebrations” by Cordelia Hamilton and Adele Earnest, both early collectors, researchers of Scholl's work, and former owners of the Stony Point Folk Art Gallery in the Hudson Valley.


Scholl’s tools were scarce. His primary tool was a jackknife and sometimes a band saw. His works included themes of his Pennsylvania-German heritage, celebrating Christmas, snowfall, springtime, weddings, the circus and peace on earth. Like his building style, he often included whimsical trim and decorative ornament depicting birds, tulips, snowflakes, and star-crossed circles, all of which appear on this offered example.


The entire collection of only forty-five works was acquired by the Stony Point Folk Art Gallery and offered for sale in 1967 at an exhibition held by the Willard Gallery in New York. Since then, Scholl's works have seldom appeared in the marketplace, making this a rare opportunity to acquire a John Scholl masterpiece.


Other similar examples can be found in the permanent collections of the American Folk Art Museum, New York, the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, the Memorial Art Gallery of the University of Rochester and the University of Pennsylvania Museum.

A New Dimension of Tradition: Important American Folk Art, Proceeds of the Sale to Benefit a New Folk Art Initiative at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
Live Auction Begins:25 Jan 2020 | 07:30 PM GMT