EXCEPTIONAL HOLLOW MOLDED AND GILT COPPER GRASSHOPPER WEATHERVANE, ATTRIBUTED TO L.W. CUSHING & SONS WALTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS, CIRCA 1883
EXCEPTIONAL HOLLOW MOLDED AND GILT COPPER GRASSHOPPER WEATHERVANE, ATTRIBUTED TO L.W. CUSHING & SONS WALTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS, CIRCA 1883
Lot Closed
EXCEPTIONAL HOLLOW MOLDED AND GILT COPPER GRASSHOPPER WEATHERVANE, ATTRIBUTED TO L.W. CUSHING & SONS WALTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS, CIRCA 1883
EXCEPTIONAL HOLLOW MOLDED AND GILT COPPER GRASSHOPPER WEATHERVANE, ATTRIBUTED TO L.W. CUSHING & SONS WALTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS, CIRCA 1883
EXCEPTIONAL HOLLOW MOLDED AND GILT COPPER GRASSHOPPER WEATHERVANE, ATTRIBUTED TO L.W. CUSHING & SONS WALTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS, CIRCA 1883
EXCEPTIONAL HOLLOW MOLDED AND GILT COPPER GRASSHOPPER WEATHERVANE, ATTRIBUTED TO L.W. CUSHING & SONS WALTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS, CIRCA 1883
1416

EXCEPTIONAL HOLLOW MOLDED AND GILT COPPER GRASSHOPPER WEATHERVANE, ATTRIBUTED TO L.W. CUSHING & SONS WALTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS, CIRCA 1883

Estimate: 100,000 - 150,000 USD

EXCEPTIONAL HOLLOW MOLDED AND GILT COPPER GRASSHOPPER WEATHERVANE, ATTRIBUTED TO L.W. CUSHING & SONS WALTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS, CIRCA 1883

Estimate: 100,000 - 150,000 USD
Lot sold:200,000USD

Description

EXCEPTIONAL HOLLOW MOLDED AND GILT COPPER GRASSHOPPER WEATHERVANE

ATTRIBUTED TO L.W. CUSHING & SONS

WALTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS, CIRCA 1883


Together with cast-iron directionals. (3 pieces) 

Height with stand 37 in., Height 10 in., Length 41 in.

Condition report

To request a condition report for this lot, please contact Americana@sothebys.com.

Provenance

Dr. Paul Dudley White, Boston, Massachusetts;

Larry Toyne, Leawood, Kansas;

Private Collection;

Christie's New York, Important American Furniture, Folk Art, Silver, Prints and Decoys, January 18, 2007, sale 1787, lot 268;

Stephen Score, Boston, Massachusetts.

Catalogue note

This is the finest complete example known of this highly realistic form, retaining its original upper and lower balls on the directionals. An engraving of the form appears in Cushing’s 1883 catalogue, which indicates it was copyrighted that year. The design was undoubtedly inspired by Shem Drowne’s iconic golden grasshopper, which has topped Boston’s Faneuil Hall since 1742.