View full screen - View 1 of Lot 17. JOSEPH CORNELL | UNTITLED (BLUE SAND FOUNTAIN).
17

JOSEPH CORNELL | UNTITLED (BLUE SAND FOUNTAIN)

Estimate:

40,000

to
- 60,000 USD

JOSEPH CORNELL | UNTITLED (BLUE SAND FOUNTAIN)

JOSEPH CORNELL | UNTITLED (BLUE SAND FOUNTAIN)

Estimate:

40,000

to
- 60,000 USD

Lot sold:

40,000

USD

JOSEPH CORNELL

1903 - 1972

UNTITLED (BLUE SAND FOUNTAIN)


signed on the reverse

sand, wood, glass and string in wooden box construction

12 by 8 by 4 in. (30.5 by 20.3 by 10.2 cm)

Executed circa 1950.


Please note that this work will be exhibited at Allan Stone Projects. Purchased items will be available for collection at Crozier Fine Arts, 1 Star Ledger Plaza, Newark, NJ as of Thursday, December 13th.

The work is in very good condition overall. All elements are present and stable. There is minor wear to the elements, inherent to the found medium.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot provided by Sotheby's. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colours and shades which are different to the lot's actual colour and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation because Sotheby's is not a professional conservator or restorer but rather the condition report is a statement of opinion genuinely held by Sotheby's. For that reason, Sotheby's condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot.

New York, Allan Stone Gallery, Joseph Cornell, January - February 1972

New York, Allan Stone Gallery, Joseph Cornell, October - December 2002, cat. no. 22

New York, Allan Stone Gallery, World in a Box, March - May 2012

New York, Allan Stone Gallery, Fall Selections, September - October 2013


Joseph Cornell was a self-taught artist, recluse, and master of Assemblage. Influenced by as many subjects as he included in his artworks—American Transcendentalists, European Surrealism, Hollywood, ballet, the French Symbolists—Cornell charged humble materials with intrigue, mystery and unforeseen complexity, combining them in intimate box constructions and collages. From the moment of a storied meeting at Cornell's Utopia Parkway home and studio in 1962, he became a central figure in Allan Stone's collection and gallery program, with many of the artist's most significant works passing through Allan Stone's hands. Cornell has been the subject of countless exhibitions. He was shown alongside his friend, Marcel Duchamp, in the 1936 exhibition Fantastic Art, Dada & Surrealism at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, honored in 1967 with a retrospective at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, and an exhibition of his collages at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, in 1971. His work is found in numerous museum collections, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York, Art Institute of Chicago, Tate Gallery, London, and Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington DC.


Please note that this work will be exhibited at Allan Stone Projects.

Joseph Cornell was a self-taught artist, recluse, and master of Assemblage. Influenced by as many subjects as he included in his artworks—American Transcendentalists, European Surrealism, Hollywood, ballet, the French Symbolists—Cornell charged humble materials with intrigue, mystery and unforeseen complexity, combining them in intimate box constructions and collages. From the moment of a storied meeting at Cornell's Utopia Parkway home and studio in 1962, he became a central figure in Allan Stone's collection and gallery program, with many of the artist's most significant works passing through Allan Stone's hands. Cornell has been the subject of countless exhibitions. He was shown alongside his friend, Marcel Duchamp, in the 1936 exhibition Fantastic Art, Dada & Surrealism at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, honored in 1967 with a retrospective at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, and an exhibition of his collages at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, in 1971. His work is found in numerous museum collections, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York, Art Institute of Chicago, Tate Gallery, London, and Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington DC.