View full screen - View 1 of Lot 14. ARSHILE GORKY | UNTITLED.
14

ARSHILE GORKY | UNTITLED

Estimate:

18,000

to
- 25,000 USD

ARSHILE GORKY | UNTITLED

ARSHILE GORKY | UNTITLED

Estimate:

18,000

to
- 25,000 USD

ARSHILE GORKY

1904 - 194

UNTITLED


graphite on paper

Sheet: 12½ by 9½ in. (31.8 by 24.1 cm)

Framed: 19½ by 17 in. (49.5 by 43.2 cm)

Executed circa 1940s, this work is catalogued in the Arshile Gorky Foundation Archives as number D1520.


Please note that this work will be exhibited at Allan Stone Projects. Purchased items will be available for collection at Crozier Fine Arts, 1 Star Ledger Plaza, Newark, NJ as of Thursday, December 13th.

Please note that this work has not been examined out of its frame. This work is in very good condition overall. The work appears to be hinged intermittently along the reverse to the backing board. The edges are deckled. There is minor yellowing to the sheet. There is smudging to the medium throughout, most likely due to the artist's working method. There tape on the reverse of the sheet is slightly visible at the upper edge. There is minor undulation the sheet. Framed under Plexiglas.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot provided by Sotheby's. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colours and shades which are different to the lot's actual colour and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation because Sotheby's is not a professional conservator or restorer but rather the condition report is a statement of opinion genuinely held by Sotheby's. For that reason, Sotheby's condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot.

New York, Allan Stone Projects, Artists of the New York School, October - December 2016

New York, Allan Stone Projects, Draughtsmanship: Selected Drawings from the Allan Stone Collection, March - April 2018

Of the many abstract painters exhibited and collected by Allan Stone, few are more closely associated with his program and expertise than Abstract Expressionist Arshile Gorky. Allan Stone mounted numerous comprehensive exhibitions of Gorky's work, and many of the most revered Gorky paintings and works on paper in prestigious collections today passed through Allan Stone's hands.


Though his life was tragically short, Gorky is recognized as an essential bridge between European Surrealism and American Abstract Expression. Gorky is most recognizable in mature works that employ the Surrealist technique of “automatic drawing,” where pen or pencil marks are made without preconception and the creations are interpreted as subconscious thought. His innovative style combined childhood memories – the gardens, orchards and wheat fields – with direct observations from his American life. The resultant works are both specific and allusive, generating symbols that are both stirring and relatable, but unable to be definitively identified. Many artists, particularly those of the 1950s New York School, have credited Gorky as a major source of inspiration.


Gorky was first exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art in 1930, with fellow artists under thirty-five. Countless other exhibitions ensued, including a retrospective of drawings at the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Menil Collection in Houston, in 2003, and another in 2009 at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, traveling to the Tate Modern in London, and Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles. Gorky’s work is in numerous museum collections, including the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humlebaek, Denmark, and Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris. In a decade characterized by personal tragedy, Gorky took his own life in Sherman, Connecticut, in 1948. The Arshile Gorky Foundation was established by the artist’s family in 2005, with a mission to further develop and shape his lasting influence.