View full screen - View 1 of Lot 10. WILLEM DE KOONING | UNTITLED.
10

WILLEM DE KOONING | UNTITLED

Estimate:

40,000

to
- 60,000 USD

9

10

11

WILLEM DE KOONING | UNTITLED

WILLEM DE KOONING | UNTITLED

Estimate:

40,000

to
- 60,000 USD

WILLEM DE KOONING

1904 - 1997

UNTITLED


signed; inscribed Happy Birthday to Herman from Bill on the reverse

crayon and paper collage on paper mounted to canvas

Canvas: 13½ by 19½ in. (34.3 by 49.5 cm)

Framed: 23½ by 28¾ in. (59.7 by 73 cm)

Executed in 1960.


Please note that this work will be exhibited at Allan Stone Projects. Purchased items will be available for collection at Crozier Fine Arts, 1 Star Ledger Plaza, Newark, NJ as of Thursday, December 13th.

This work is in very good condition overall. There is some yellowing to the sheets and minor pinpoint foxing in places, visible upon close inspection. There is tape along the turning edges and the extreme surface edges of the work, not visible when framed. There is a minor differentiation to the sheen of the work along the extreme edges, most likely from framing, visible upon close inspection and not visible when framed. Framed under glass.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot provided by Sotheby's. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colours and shades which are different to the lot's actual colour and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation because Sotheby's is not a professional conservator or restorer but rather the condition report is a statement of opinion genuinely held by Sotheby's. For that reason, Sotheby's condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot.

New York, Sidney Janis Gallery, Recent Paintings by Willem de Kooning, 1962, no. 25, illustrated

East Hampton, Eric Firestone Gallery, Montauk Highway: Postwar Abstraction in the Hamptons, August - September 2017


Of all the abstract painters exhibited and collected by Allan Stone, none is more closely associated with his program and expertise than the Abstract Expressionist giant Willem de Kooning. Allan Stone mounted numerous comprehensive exhibitions of de Kooning's work, and many of the most revered de Kooning paintings and works on paper in prestigious collections passed through Allan Stone's hands.


Untitled (East Hampton), 1960, displays formal connections to both the "Montauk Highway" paintings of the mid- to late-1950s, as well as the "Rome Paintings" of 1959/1960. Though described in crayon rather than oil paint, the gestural landscape-like forms in this work clearly relate to the earlier epic canvases and smaller paintings on collaged paper that were influenced by the surrounding Long Island landscape. Additionally, Untitled (East Hampton) is composed of sweeping bands and overlapping shapes on torn and mounted paper quite similar to those that de Kooning employed earlier that year while working in Rome on his famed black and white series. One might presume he returned to Long Island from Rome inspired by the works he had just completed and the reunion with the landscape he found so compelling.


Willem de Kooning was born in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, in 1904. As a youth, he spent nights studying at the city’s Academy of Fine Arts and Techniques. In 1926, de Kooning immigrated to the United States. While establishing himself among the group of ascendant Abstract Expressionists, de Kooning briefly taught at Black Mountain College and the Yale University School of Art. He painted voraciously from the 1940s through the late 1980s, when dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease halted his artistic production. Early shows at Charles Egan Gallery and Sidney Janis Gallery segued into large scale exhibitions at the Smithsonian Institute, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Whitney Museum of American Art, and Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Posthumous exhibitions include a full-career retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in 2011, among smaller shows at Gagosian, Pace, and Allan Stone Gallery. During his lifetime, de Kooning received the Presidential Medal of Freedom (1964), the Andrew W. Mellon Prize (1979), and the National Medal of Arts (1986). The Willem de Kooning Foundation was established in 2011 by Lisa de Kooning, the artist’s daughter. De Kooning passed away in 1997, at his home in East Hampton, New York.


Please note that this work will be exhibited at Allan Stone Projects.

Of all the abstract painters exhibited and collected by Allan Stone, none is more closely associated with his program and expertise than the Abstract Expressionist giant Willem de Kooning. Allan Stone mounted numerous comprehensive exhibitions of de Kooning's work, and many of the most revered de Kooning paintings and works on paper in prestigious collections passed through Allan Stone's hands.


Untitled (East Hampton), 1960, displays formal connections to both the "Montauk Highway" paintings of the mid- to late-1950s, as well as the "Rome Paintings" of 1959/1960. Though described in crayon rather than oil paint, the gestural landscape-like forms in this work clearly relate to the earlier epic canvases and smaller paintings on collaged paper that were influenced by the surrounding Long Island landscape. Additionally, Untitled (East Hampton) is composed of sweeping bands and overlapping shapes on torn and mounted paper quite similar to those that de Kooning employed earlier that year while working in Rome on his famed black and white series. One might presume he returned to Long Island from Rome inspired by the works he had just completed and the reunion with the landscape he found so compelling.


Willem de Kooning was born in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, in 1904. As a youth, he spent nights studying at the city’s Academy of Fine Arts and Techniques. In 1926, de Kooning immigrated to the United States. While establishing himself among the group of ascendant Abstract Expressionists, de Kooning briefly taught at Black Mountain College and the Yale University School of Art. He painted voraciously from the 1940s through the late 1980s, when dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease halted his artistic production. Early shows at Charles Egan Gallery and Sidney Janis Gallery segued into large scale exhibitions at the Smithsonian Institute, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Whitney Museum of American Art, and Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Posthumous exhibitions include a full-career retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in 2011, among smaller shows at Gagosian, Pace, and Allan Stone Gallery. During his lifetime, de Kooning received the Presidential Medal of Freedom (1964), the Andrew W. Mellon Prize (1979), and the National Medal of Arts (1986). The Willem de Kooning Foundation was established in 2011 by Lisa de Kooning, the artist’s daughter. De Kooning passed away in 1997, at his home in East Hampton, New York. Posthumous exhibitions include a full-career retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art, New York in 2011, among smaller shows at Gagosian, Pace, and Allan Stone Gallery.