Pablo Picasso

Le Peintre et son modèle IV

signed Picasso, dated and numbered 2.7.70.IV (upper left)

pen and ink with pencil on cardboard

8½ by 12¼ in.

21.6 by 31.1 cm.

Executed on 2 July 1970.

Price upon request

Details
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Pablo Picasso
Le Peintre et son modèle IV

signed Picasso, dated and numbered 2.7.70.IV (upper left)

pen and ink with pencil on cardboard

8½ by 12¼ in.

21.6 by 31.1 cm.

Executed on 2 July 1970.
Provenance

Galerie Louise Leiris, Paris (acquired from the artist)

Galerie Berggruen & Cie, Paris (acquired from the above in 1971)

Private Collection, Austria (acquired from the above in 1979)

Im Kinsky, Vienna, 10 November 2011, lot 1037

Acquired from the above by the present owner

Exhibition

Paris, Galerie Louise Leiris, Picasso dessins en noir et en couleurs 15 Dec 1969-12 Jan 1971, 1971, no. 98, illustrated

London, Waddington Galleries, Léger, Picasso: Paintings and Drawings, 1971, no. 37, illustrated

Shanghai, Global Harbor Museum, The Legend of Art: Picasso, 2015-16, no. 7, illustrated p. 47

Literature

Christian Zervos, Pablo Picasso, Oeuvres de 1970, Paris, 1977, vol. XXXII, no. 183, illustrated pl. 62

Catalogue Note

Throughout his career, Picasso chose to paint subjects that represented his life as an artist, and the theme that came to symbolize his own life and work most evocatively was that of the painter and his model. The male figure, a recognizable amalgamation of self-portrait, paints a female nude reminiscent of the women seen in canvases by Rubens and Ingres. With its foundation in this trajectory of art history, Le Peintre et son modèle is a monumental and dynamic depiction of this historic theme. 


The motif of the female nude fascinated Picasso throughout his career, providing the inspiration for many of his greatest works. In various periods of his life, Picasso’s art was closely related to his personal relationships and the women depicted in his paintings were always influenced by Picasso’s female companions at the time. In Le Peintre et son modèle, the female figure is inspired by Jacqueline, the last love of his life, whom Picasso married in 1961. Although she is not a direct likeness of Jacqueline, with her characteristic hairstyle and almond eyes she bears the key features with which Picasso usually portrayed his last muse. The essence of Jacqueline, who never formally posed as Picasso’s model, is always present in his portraits of this period, including the present work.