GIORGIO DE CHIRICO Gli Archeologi

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Details

GIORGIO DE CHIRICO
Gli Archeologi
Signed g. de Chirico (lower right)
Oil on canvas
23⅝ by 19¾ in.
60 by 50 cm
Painted in 1965.
The authenticity of this work has been confirmed by the Fondazione Giorgio e Isa de Chirico.

PROVENANCE
Isabella de Chirico, Rome (the artist's wife)
Private Collection (sold: Farsettiarte Milan, May 31, 2008, lot 767)
Private Collection (acquired at the above sale and sold: Farsettiarte, Milan, May 31, 2009, lot 871)
Sale: Farsettiarte, Milan, June 1, 2013, lot 61)
Private Collection (acquired at the above sale)

EXHIBITED
Cortina d’Ampezzo, Farsettiarte & Florence, Galleria d'Arte Frediano Farsetti, La Neometafisica. Giorgio de Chirico & Andy Warhol, 2011-12, no. 17, illustrated in color in the catalogue
Seravezza, Palazzo Mediceo, Le Avventure della forma. Dall'espressività di Viani, Sironi, Rosai, alla realtà allucinata di Ligabue. Transavanguardia e oltre, 2012, illustrated in color in the catalogue

CATALOGUE NOTE
Gli Archeologi belongs to a group of works by Giorgio de Chirico that addresses the subject of archaeologists. De Chirico began exploring this motif in the late 1920s, when he was working in a neo-classicist style aligned with the widespread cultural call to “return to order” following the atrocities of World War I. Typically presented in pairs, de Chirico’s archaeologists are composed of the most emblematic elements of his deeply personal visual lexicon, including antique ruins and the mannequin. The present work, painted in 1965, speaks to de Chirico’s lifelong interest in this theme and its significance in his creative development. Two seated figures dressed in Roman togas possess anonymous mannequin heads. Their corporeal arms embrace fragments of temples, aqueducts, columns, and arcades in a reversal of the conventional relationship between figure and architecture. The unexpected juxtaposition of these familiar objects in an ambiguous setting serves to surprise and disorient the viewer—an effect heightened by the spatial tension created by de Chirico’s acute foreshortening and multiplicity of vanishing points.

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Currently Available for Private Sale

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