70
70
Helene Nonné Schmidt
"SEEROSEN"
Estimate
8,00012,000
JUMP TO LOT
70
Helene Nonné Schmidt
"SEEROSEN"
Estimate
8,00012,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important 20th Century Design

|
New York

Helene Nonné Schmidt
"SEEROSEN"

Provenance

Collection of Joost and Helene Nonné Schmidt, Germany
Acquired from the above by Heinz and Mirka Nösselt, Berlin, circa 1940
Collection of Oliver Axer, Berlin
Thence by descent to the present owner

Catalogue Note

The present lot and following encompass works from the collection of Bauhaus architect Heinz Nösselt, designer of the Bauhaus chess table to accompany Josef Hartwig's renowned chess set designed in 1924.  Nösselt in partnership with Hans Vogler, was also instrumental in supervising the construction of the masters' houses at the Dessau Bauhaus from 1925-1926. 

Helene Nonné Schmidt, the Bauhus artist of the floral painting (lot 70), was the wife of fellow Bauhäusler Joost Schmidt, and at first studied under Gunta Stölzl in the Weaving Workshop at the school in the mid-1920s.  Nonné Schmidt notably internalized the Bauhaus ideology of combining theory with intent while studying in Paul Klee's course on theory and formalism in painting.  This piece displays her later exploration into painting during the 1930s, of which the present lot is one of only four works.  The floral motif retains elements of the vibrant coloration and simplified forms seen in previous designs for textiles and wall hangings, however this composition departs from the geometric in favor of the biomorphic and vegetal.

The chairs and table (lot 71), also owned by Nösselt, are early production examples of Mies van der Rohe's furniture designs, from the late 1920s, at the same period he was designing works for the Barcelona Pavilion representing the Weimar Republic in 1929 for the International Exposition in Spain.  The construction of the chairs and table employs a two-screw lap-joint corner detail and flat bar construction, delineating their early production date by Bamberg Metallwerkstätten/Berliner Metallgewerbe, and both chairs retain their original leather upholstery.  Mies’ ideological focus on clarity, simplicity and honesty in the architectural space of the Barcelona Pavilion is reflected in the present lot, with a focus on truth to materials and construction, as well as elegance and functionality.

The fact that these four works were later acquired by the Nösselts for their personal collection highlights the ongoing creative relationships between Bauhaus students and teachers even after the close of the school in 1932.

Lot 70 is being sold with a written history from Mirka Nösselt dated 1993.

Important 20th Century Design

|
New York