3679
3679
A WHITE JADE FIGURE OF A RAM
QING DYNASTY, 18TH CENTURY
Estimate
700,000900,000
JUMP TO LOT
3679
A WHITE JADE FIGURE OF A RAM
QING DYNASTY, 18TH CENTURY
Estimate
700,000900,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Chinese Art

|
Hong Kong

A WHITE JADE FIGURE OF A RAM
QING DYNASTY, 18TH CENTURY
well worked from a lustrous white stone, portrayed recumbent with its legs tucked beneath its rounded body, its head facing forward with two curved striated horns rendered in openwork and extending downwards, the back of the beast subtly accentuated with a curved spinal column terminating in a short tail detailed with incisions
6.8 cm, 2 5/8  in.
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Provenance

Sotheby's London, 6th June 1995, lot 44.

Exhibited

Minneapolis Institute of Arts, Minneapolis, Minnesota, on loan, 1997-2008, no. L97.327.16.

Catalogue Note

Small jade carvings of animals, often depicted in recumbent poses, became an essential item for the scholar’s desk as they were used both as paperweights and as works of art in their own right. Figures of rams have a long history in China, first appearing on Shang ritual bronzes and in the form of bronze lamps and ceramic tomb figures during the Han dynasty. By the Qing dynasty, the ram had acquired many symbolic associations: it was considered symbolic of peace, prosperity and filial piety, as it was said to kneel with reverence when drinking its mother’s milk. See two related 18th-century white jade examples sold in these rooms: the first one, 8th April 2014, lot 3150, and the other, with the head turned backwards, 7th October 2015, lot 3776. Compare also a jade ram with a slightly raised head, offered in this sale, lot 3674.

Important Chinese Art

|
Hong Kong