3071
3071
A FINE CELADON-GLAZED BASIN
SEAL MARK AND PERIOD OF QIANLONG
Estimate
900,0001,200,000
LOT SOLD. 1,480,000 HKD
JUMP TO LOT
3071
A FINE CELADON-GLAZED BASIN
SEAL MARK AND PERIOD OF QIANLONG
Estimate
900,0001,200,000
LOT SOLD. 1,480,000 HKD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Fine Chinese Ceramics and Works of Art

|
Hong Kong

A FINE CELADON-GLAZED BASIN
SEAL MARK AND PERIOD OF QIANLONG
the shallow rounded sides slightly flaring out from a protruding foot, encircled by a single raised fillet, very finely incised on the interior with a wide roundel centred with a lotus blossom wreathed by four interlocked archaistic chilong, two with incurved horns and two others with bifid tails, surrounded on the walls by five further lotus blossoms flanked by angular scrolls, repeated around the exterior below an archaistic border at the rim, applied overall with an even pale sea-green glaze pooling to a darker tone within the incised decorations, the footring and recessed base glazed, save for a round circle left in the biscuit and dressed in an orange wash in imitation of the Song dynasty Longquan ware, the latter centred in underglaze blue with a six-character seal mark   
26 cm. 10 1/4  in.
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Provenance

Collection of Baron Denzaburo Fujita (1841-1912).
Fujita family collection.

Catalogue Note

A closely related example was sold twice in these rooms, 20th May 1980, lot 77, and again, 24th November 1987, lot 117. Basins of this type were inspired by celadon saucer dishes made in the Ming dynasty and were first revived in the Yongzheng period; compare a large fifteenth century saucer dish illustrated in Regina Krahl, Chinese Ceramics in the Topkapi  Saray Museum, Istanbul, vol. I, London, 1986, pl. 318; and a Yongzheng mark and period basin freely engraved with a Ming-style peony spray, sold at Christie’s London, 12th December 1988, lot 332.

A plain washer of this form with a Qianlong mark and of the period, but of smaller dimensions and covered in a Ru-type glaze, from the J.M. Hu collection, was sold in our New York rooms, 4th June 1985, lot 47, and again at Christie’s New York, 20th September 2005, lot 291, from the Rodriguez collection.

The Fujita Museum in Osaka houses over 5000 pieces of Chinese and Japanese works of art collected by Baron Denzaburo Fujita (1841-1912) and opened to the public in 1954. Of these, nine pieces have been designated as National Treasures, including the famous Yohen Tenmoku Tea Bowl, and fifty are designated as important cultural assets. Baron Denzaburo Fujita was a leading industrialist, politician and one of the greatest tea masters of the Meiji period and was acclaimed to have the best private collection in the Kansai region. Following his death, part of his collection was sold at auction.

Fine Chinese Ceramics and Works of Art

|
Hong Kong