26
26
Frederick Carder
AN IMPORTANT AND RARE "DIATRETA" VASE
Estimate
40,00060,000
LOT SOLD. 59,375 USD
JUMP TO LOT
26
Frederick Carder
AN IMPORTANT AND RARE "DIATRETA" VASE
Estimate
40,00060,000
LOT SOLD. 59,375 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important 20th Century Design

|
New York

Frederick Carder
AN IMPORTANT AND RARE "DIATRETA" VASE
engraved F. Carder/1957
pâte-de-verre
8 in. (20.3 cm) high
7 1/2  in. (19.1 cm) diameter
1957
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Provenance

Ray and Lee Grover, Naples, FL, 1987

Literature

Albert Christian Revi, American Art Nouveau Glass, Camden, NJ, 1968, p. 182 (for related examples)
Paul V. Gardner, The Glass of Frederick Carder, New York, 1971, pl. XXXII, figs. A-B and p. 132, figs. III.206-208 (for related examples)
Paul V. Gardner, Frederick Carder:  Portrait of a Glassmaker, exh. cat., The Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, NY, 1985, pp. 112-115 (for related examples)
Thomas P. Dimitroff, Frederick Carder and Steuben:  American Glass Classics, Atglen, PA, 1998, p. 114 (for a related example)

Catalogue Note

Corning Glass Works unceremoniously replaced Frederick Carder as Steuben’s manager and director in 1932.  The glasshouse had been running at a deficit for several years and, although changing tastes did have some impact on its financial situation, management felt Carder’s reluctance to modernize and streamline the operation was a greater hindrance.  So, at the age of 69 and after running Steuben since its founding in 1903, Frederick Carder was forced to find a new outlet for his considerable energy and talents.  Allowed to keep his large office at Corning Glass Works, Carder soon converted it into a studio-workshop, complete with its own glass furnace.  He spent the remaining thirty years of his life conducting experiments and creating a number of remarkable objects, including Diatreta.

Carder received his artistic training as a youth in England, and, as was typical of the late 19th century, much of his education was classically based.  His bronze sculpture of an archer, cast in 1897, and the Greco-Roman designs for the cameo work he did while at Stevens and Williams best exemplify his devotion to this artistic style.  Hence, it is not surprising that he decided to accept the challenge of attempting to create ancient Diatreta vases once he was granted the freedom to do so.

Diatreta objects, also known as cage cups, first appeared in Rome during the 4th century A.D.  At that time, glassworkers used lapidary tools to carve away at the thick glass, so that the design in relief was connected to the body of the vase only by small, thin struts.  The most famous example is the “Lycurgus Cup” in the British Museum.  Glassmakers had tried to reproduce this technique for centuries, and Carder attempted it by using the cire perdue, or lost wax, method to make the molds and the pâte-de-verre technique to create the objects.  All of Carder’s Diatreta vases, which are exceptionally rare, were made between 1945 and 1959 and were done entirely by him, except for the grinding of the bottoms.  Tiffany Furnaces also produced a type of vase known as Diatreta in a very limited number, but their quality and artistry never came close to approximating what Frederick Carder was able to accomplish.

─Paul Doros

Important 20th Century Design

|
New York