18
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A WUCAI 'BAJIXIANG AND LOTUS' JAR
MARK AND PERIOD OF JIAJING
Estimate
400,000600,000
LOT SOLD. 437,500 HKD
JUMP TO LOT
18
A WUCAI 'BAJIXIANG AND LOTUS' JAR
MARK AND PERIOD OF JIAJING
Estimate
400,000600,000
LOT SOLD. 437,500 HKD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Tianminlou – A Small History of Chinese Ceramics

|
Hong Kong

A WUCAI 'BAJIXIANG AND LOTUS' JAR
MARK AND PERIOD OF JIAJING
of square baluster form surmounted by an upright neck, the exterior painted with eight lotus blossoms borne on a meandering leafy scroll, each lotus beneath one of the bajixiang emblems, all between a ruyi-border at the shoulders and lappets encircling the foot, the neck collared by a key-fret border, the recessed base inscribed in underglaze blue with a six-character reign mark within a double-square, wood stand
12 cm, 4 3/4  in.
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Provenance

Sotheby's Hong Kong, 19th November 1986, lot 213.

Exhibited

Chinese Porcelain in the S.C. Ko Tianminlou Collection, Hong Kong Museum of Art, Hong Kong, 1987, cat. no. 72.

Literature

Liu Liang-yu, A Survey of Chinese Ceramics, vol. 4: Ming Official Wares, Taipei, 1991, p. 204 (bottom).

Catalogue Note

Jars of this square form decorated with such vibrant designs were an innovation of the Jiajing period that displays the creative freedom enjoyed by potters active in this period. The colourful wucai palette, allowed potters to create increasingly complex and colourful motifs, as cobalt blue was used for colouring and not only for delineating outlines as in the doucai (‘dove-tailed colours’) colour scheme. While Jiajing potters did not develop completely new colours or decorative techniques, they creatively expanded the range of styles and colour schemes to create bolder designs.

Compare three jars of this type sold in our London rooms, the first, from the collection of Stephen D. Winkworth, 25th April 1933, lot 347, the second with cover, from the collection of Lord Hollenden, 27th November 1973, lot 297, and the third of slightly larger size, from the Joseph M. Morpurgo collection, 11th May 2016, lot 171; two jars sold at Christie’s London, 21st April 1986, lots 412 and 413, the former sold again in our London rooms, 12th December 1989, lot 309; and a further example sold at Christie’s Hong Kong, 5th/6th September 1997, lot 1051.

This motif continued to be popular in the succeeding Wanli reign (r. 1573-1620), when it was used on jars of globular shape; see for example a Wanli mark and period jar in the Shanghai Museum, illustrated in Lu Minghua, Mingdai guanyao ciqi [Ming imperial porcelain], Shanghai, 2007, pl. 4-23; and another, from the collection of Kwong Yee Che Tong, included in the exhibition The Fame of Flame. Imperial Wares of the Jiajing and Wanli Periods, Art Gallery, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, 2009, cat. no. 107.

Tianminlou – A Small History of Chinese Ceramics

|
Hong Kong