70
70

PROPERTY REMOVED FROM DINMORE MANOR CHAPEL, HEREFORDSHIRE

An English chamber organ by Samuel Green, London, 1786
JUMP TO LOT
70

PROPERTY REMOVED FROM DINMORE MANOR CHAPEL, HEREFORDSHIRE

An English chamber organ by Samuel Green, London, 1786
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Style: Private Collections

|
London

An English chamber organ by Samuel Green, London, 1786
the case of mahogany with three panels of gold-painted display pipes (3, 19, 3), all backed with red silk, with decorative brass wirework at the corners of the central oval panel, the mahogany panels flanking the keyboard with holly stringing, the cornice with dentil moulding, the retractable keyboard, compass five octaves and one note, GG to f3 omitting GG sharp, with ivory naturals and ebony accidentals, ten hand stops inscribed as Fifteenth, Principal Treble, Principal Bass, Stop Diapason Treble and Stop Diapason Bass on the left side and Cornet Treble, Cornet Bass, Flute, Dulciana and Open Diapason on the right side, one pedal, later music desk, two articulated candle brackets, inscribed on a boxwood plaque above the keyboard Samuel Green London 1786
335cm. high, 211.5cm. wide, 108cm. deep; 11ft high, 6ft. 11 1/4 in. wide, 3ft. 6 1/2 in.
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Provenance

Possibly built for Sir George Cornewall, 2nd Bt. (1748-1819), for Moccas Court, Herefordshire, circa 1786;
moved to Dinmore Manor Chapel, Herefordshire, probably in the second half of the 19th century;
on loan at Croft Castle, Herefordshire, 2007-2019.

Literature

Michael Wilson, The English Chamber Organ, Oxford, 1968, pp. 73-4;
David Wickens, The Instruments of Samuel Green, Macmillan, 1987, pp. 126-7;
National Pipe Organ Register, online at http://www.npor.org.uk/NPORView.html?RI=J00031

Catalogue Note

The organ was apparently built by Samuel Green for Sir George Cornewall's new house at Moccas Court in Herefordshire in 1786. Samuel Green was the foremost organ builder of his day. He operated independently between 1772 and 1796, whose streamlined operation allowed for greater standardisation and more innovation. He made a large number of church and chamber organs with similar examples to the present organ at Downton Castle, Herefordshire (1787) with its twin at Edith Weston, Rutland, and Attingham Park, Shropshire (1788).

Sotheby's would like to thank Dr. Graham Wells for his assistance cataloguing this lot. Please note, the organ will only be available for inspection at Sotheby’s Greenford Park warehouse prior to the sale and is sold with a report from Messrs Martin Goetz & Dominic Gwynn Ltd. dated 1st April 2017 (updated 15th February 2019).

Style: Private Collections

|
London