396
396
An English tortoiseshell, mother of pearl, ivory and rosewood table necessaire, probably Birmingham, circa 1835
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396
An English tortoiseshell, mother of pearl, ivory and rosewood table necessaire, probably Birmingham, circa 1835
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Style: European Silver, Ceramics, and Objects of Vertu

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London

An English tortoiseshell, mother of pearl, ivory and rosewood table necessaire, probably Birmingham, circa 1835
the tortoiseshell surfaces richly inlaid with flower sprays in mother of pearl, rectangular, on four carved ivory bun-shaped supports, a column in each corner, the two doors at the front opening to reveal a removable writing desk with folding surface, pen depression and two inkpots, two small horizontal draws fitted for finger rings, two small vertical draws, another larger drawer, a further sliding draw fitted with the following die-stamped silver or silver-mounted items: a spool-shaped thread waxer, a thimble with motto: 'THO ABSENT EVER DEAR,' a steel pen knife, a pair of steel scissors and sheath, a needle case and cover, a mother of pearl awl and a pin cushion, also two thread winders (one Cantonese mother of pearl), and four balls of cream-coloured cotton thread labelled 'BROOK'S PATENT 30,' a small door at the centre veneered in tortoisehell pressed with a gothic arched doorway, the top with hinged lid, the interiors lined in dark green velvet and ink silk
ivory, tortoiseshell, rosewood, silver
36.5cm., 14 3/8in. high; 41.5cm., 16 1/4in, wide; 29.5cm., 11 1/2in. deep
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Catalogue Note

An advertisement placed by John Hodson, furnishing ironmonger, &c., &c. of 62 King Street, Manchester in The Manchester Courier (13 January 1838, p. 1b) mentions among his stock ‘a Magnificent and Valuable TORTOISESHELL CABINET, Elaborately inlaid with Mother-o’-Pearl, and fitted up in the most complete manner.’ There can be little doubt that this object was similar to the example in this present lot. A few days later in the same newspaper (27 January 1838, p. 3c) there appeared a more detailed description of Mr. Hodgson’s cabinet: ‘It is of the pagoda form, supported by four elegant pillars, of the same material as that of which the body is constructed. . . . The roof, on being raised, presents a compartment for the deposition of articles of needle-work, writing-paper, or any other light material. At the bottom is a drawer for the same purpose. Between these are a lady’s writing desk, tastefully fitted up . . . two secret drawers for private memoranda, three others for letters, &c., two for rings, brooches, and other valuables, and one for money and jewels. . . . Its external appearance is splendid in the extreme, the fabric being wholly of real tortoise-shell, inlaid with mother-of-pearl, in richly fancy flowers and devices. The panels of the doors are remarkably beautiful. We cannot but recommend all who have not yet seen this most splendid trifle, to pay Mr. Hodgson an immediate visit. . . .’

Style: European Silver, Ceramics, and Objects of Vertu

|
London