387
387
Ambassadorial. A George III silver double-lidded treasury inkstand, Joseph Preedy, London, 1800
Estimate
10,00015,000
JUMP TO LOT
387
Ambassadorial. A George III silver double-lidded treasury inkstand, Joseph Preedy, London, 1800
Estimate
10,00015,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Style: European Silver, Ceramics, and Objects of Vertu

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London

Ambassadorial. A George III silver double-lidded treasury inkstand, Joseph Preedy, London, 1800
the plain shallow rectangular base incurved at the angles above four massive cast paw supports, applied reeded border to the base and hinged lids, the latter engraved with two coats-of-arms, supporters and mottos, the interior with two fixed holders, one with a fitted inkwell with detachable cover, the other with fitted pounce pot with detachable cover
34cm., 13 1/2 in. wide
2853gr., 91oz. 14dwt.
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Catalogue Note

The first, royal coat-of-arms are those as borne by George III.

The second coat-of-arms are those of William Schaw Cathcart, 1st Earl Cathcart (1755-1843), with two woodwose supporters instead of two parrots and augmented with the Order of the Thistle, the Order of St. George of Russia and the Order of St. Andrew of Russia.

Cathcart, army officer and politician, was born at Petersham, Surrey on 17 September 1755, the son and heir of Charles Schaw Cathcart, Lord Cathcart (1721-1776) and his wife, Jean (1726-1771), daughter of Lord Archibald Hamilton, Governor of Greenwich Hospital. He was educated at Eton, 1766 to 1771 and studied law before entering the Army, 7th Dragoons, in 1777. Between then until his retirement from the military he saw active service in America, Germany and elsewhere, his last important engagement being as Commander-in-Chief of the Army against Denmark, where in 1807 he besieged and captured Copenhagen, for which he received the thanks of the House of Lords. As a diplomat he was appointed Ambassador to the Court of Russia in 1805/06 and again from the summer of 1812 to 1820. He was created Earl Cathcart on 16 July 1814 and was Joint Minister Plenipotentiary to the Congress of Vienna in 1814/15.

Earl Cathcart, who was married at New York in 1779 to Elizabeth (d. 1847), daughter and co-heir of Andrew Elliott, Lieutenant-Governor of New York, died at the age of 88 on 16 June 1843 at Gartside, near Glasgow.

Style: European Silver, Ceramics, and Objects of Vertu

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London