305
305
A silver wedding box and silver sewing etui, unmarked, probably Dutch, first half of the 17th century
Estimate
2,5003,500
LOT SOLD. 3,750 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
305
A silver wedding box and silver sewing etui, unmarked, probably Dutch, first half of the 17th century
Estimate
2,5003,500
LOT SOLD. 3,750 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Style: European Silver, Ceramics, and Objects of Vertu

|
London

A silver wedding box and silver sewing etui, unmarked, probably Dutch, first half of the 17th century
former rectangular, hinged cover, engraved and chased with putto, parrots, flowers and scrolls on matting, elaborate hinge mounts; the scissor's etui pierced with scrolling foliage, body and pull-off cover with belt mounts, containing a pair of scissors, a knife and a probe, all implements with steel blades
Box, 5.3cm., 2in. long; Etui, 8.2cm., 3 1/4in. high
92gr., 2oz. 18dwt. all in
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Catalogue Note

An identical box is illustrated in J.W Fredericks, Dutch Silver..., The Hague, 1958, vol. II, p. 56 no. 186. Fredericks compares the box to a pomander, a book cover and a plaquette (187-189), which he considers to be by the same hand and writes: 'It is not quite certain that the maker of these objects was Dutch. As the book cover was probably made by an Amsterdam silversmith (it contains the psalms of David, printed in Amsterdam in 1638), whose style closely resembles that of van Hecken (Abraham van de Hecken, Amsterdam goldsmith active 1608-after 1634), we suppose that the four pieces are made by one of Van de Hecken's pupils who was as his master, gifted with an extraordinary sense of ornament.' A hexagonal salt with similar engraved ornament to the box, which was also compared by Fredericks with Van Hecken's work, hallmarked in the town of Frankenthal in Germany was sold Sothebys London, 1 November 2017, lot 711. Frankenthal received an important influx of Netherlandish craftsmen, due to religious persecution, towards the end of the 16th century

Style: European Silver, Ceramics, and Objects of Vertu

|
London