156
156
A pair of gem-set and enamelled bracelets (kara), North India, Rajasthan, mid-19th century
Estimate
4,0006,000
LOT SOLD. 8,750 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
156
A pair of gem-set and enamelled bracelets (kara), North India, Rajasthan, mid-19th century
Estimate
4,0006,000
LOT SOLD. 8,750 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Recollections of Places Past, Property from the Estate of Sir John and Lady Smith

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London

A pair of gem-set and enamelled bracelets (kara), North India, Rajasthan, mid-19th century
the hinged clasps rendered in the form of two confronting makaras, set with clear jewels on a green enamel ground, the interiors with polychrome enamel floral vines and birds, in fitted later case stamped Carrington & Co, By Appointment, 130 Regent Street, W. 
each: 7.5cm. diameter, 3in.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Previously in the collection of Maharajah Man Singh;
Gifted by him in 1878 to Patrick Carnegy (1825-1886) for his wife Isabella Butter then to her granddaughter;
Dame Beryl Oliver (1882-1972);
whose gift these were to her niece Lady Smith

As based on accompanying card: Dame Beryl Oliver, 20 South Eaton Place, S.W.
"Christian with love and best wishes from O. [...] Pair of Indian enamel bracelets presented to Patrick Carnegy C.I.E. by the Maharajah Man Singh in 1878. [...]"

Catalogue Note

Patrick Carnegy (1825-1886) was born in India to Major General Alexander and Isabella Carnegy. Despite being brought up in Scotland by his uncle, Patrick was eager to follow in his father’s footsteps and seek fortune and adventure in India. However, he was not interested in a military career, unlike his father and brother, and in 1842 he arrived in India at the young age of sixteen determined to pursue a career in the Indian Civil Service.

Patrick had a keen understanding of peoples and cultures as well as a rare gift for languages, and he mastered several Indian dialects in the two years following his arrival. These traits were recognised and appreciated, and throughout his career he was appointed to positions of increasing importance and responsibility in the Indian civil administration. Whilst working as Deputy Magistrate in Allahabad, the young civil servant met Isabella Butter, the daughter of a local garrison surgeon. Patrick fell deeply in love with the reputedly beautiful and musically-gifted young lady, and they married in 1854. Their youngest daughter Isabella Eliza Butter Carnegy, born in 1864, was the grandmother of Christian Carnegy, later Lady Smith.

Through his position, Patrick frequently met and interacted with chieftains, officials and maharajas. During official receptions, gifts were often exchanged, and local leaders proudly displayed the work of local craftsmen. These presents were fondly retained by Patrick and passed down for generations, and the collection of Sir John and Lady Smith displays some fine pieces of Indian jewellery that would likely have been gifts to Patrick Carnegy during his lifetime of service in the Indian administration.

This pair of bracelets and the fine thewa parure overleaf (lot 157) were gifted to Patrick Carnegy by the Maharajah Man Singh, or Raja Maan Singh. The Raja was one of the principal taluqdar (landowners) of Faizabad, and he became and remained a close friend of Patrick throughout their life. Raja Maan Singh would later save the lives of Isabella and her children by urging them to leave Oudh ahead of the 1857 Mutiny.

Recollections of Places Past, Property from the Estate of Sir John and Lady Smith

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London