107
107
Tuscan school, circa 1700
A VIEW OF THE VILLA SALVIATI, TUSCANY
Estimate
8,00012,000
LOT SOLD. 22,500 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
107
Tuscan school, circa 1700
A VIEW OF THE VILLA SALVIATI, TUSCANY
Estimate
8,00012,000
LOT SOLD. 22,500 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Recollections of Places Past, Property from the Estate of Sir John and Lady Smith

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London

Tuscan school, circa 1700
A VIEW OF THE VILLA SALVIATI, TUSCANY
its grounds with a departing military procession and an elegant company feasting on the terrace

oil on canvas


73cm. by 88cm.; 28 3/4 in. by 34 5/8 in.
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Provenance

Possibly comissioned by a member of the Salviati family, and thence by family descent at the Villa Salviati, Tuscany;
probably Arthur Vansittart (1807-59), Villa Salviati, Tuscany, by 1844;
probably whence brought to Foots Cray Place, Kent (according to an old handwritten label on the reverse);
Oswald Augustus Smith (1826-1902);
thence by descent to his granddaughter, Miss Nancy Oswald Smith (1896-1962), Shottesbrooke Park;
thence by descent

Catalogue Note

The Villa Salviati, perched in the hills to the north of Florence, has a long and rich history. It originally formed part of the fortifications along the Mugnone river, before being transformed into a residential palace. The layout of the villa depicted here (and still recognisable in the appearance of the villa today) dates back to the early 16th century when it was home to the wealthy and influential Salviati family. In 1705, around the time that this view was painted, ownership of the villa passed from the Roman branch of the Salviati family (whose male heirs became extinct) to the Florentine Salviatis.

Visible in this carefully rendered, topographically accurate portrait of the house is the separation of the outdoor spaces arranged by Alamanno Salviati (1510-71; see the following lot) and his son Jacopo between 1570 and 1579. Alamanno and Jacopo separated terraces and lawns (used for ceremonies, banquets and tournaments) with a columned wall from agricultural lands used for the commercial cultivation of citrus fruits and vineyards, olives, grain and barley. This division reflected the early modern belief that the suburban villa should serve for both otium (leisure) and negotium (business).

Arthur Vansittart (1807-59) started renting the Villa Salviati with his wife, Diana Crosbie, in 1836, eventually buying it, along with all its contents, in 1844. Much of the furniture and many of the pictures were brought to Foots Cray Place in Kent following the sale of the villa in 1854 (although the present work, and the following lot, do not appear to have been included in the Foots Cray sale of 1 May 1876).

Recollections of Places Past, Property from the Estate of Sir John and Lady Smith

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London