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Details & Cataloguing

Old Masters Day Sale

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Jacob Isaacksz. van Ruisdael
HAARLEM 1628/9 - 1682 AMSTERDAM
A WOODED LANDSCAPE WITH CATTLE CROSSING A STREAM IN THE DISTANCE

Provenance

Possibly Jac. Kok, Amsterdam;
Possibly his sale, Amsterdam, Cok, 6 July 1768, lot 53, for 65 florins to Toussaint;
Possibly with Toussaint, Amsterdam (this, and the above according to Hofstede de Groot 1912, see Literature);
Hugo Charles van der Gucht:
Sold by order of his trustees, London, Christie's, 26 November 1965, lot 76, for 2,400 guineas to Brod;
With Alfred Brod, London, 1965–66;
Heinz Kisters, Kreuzlingen, Switzerland, circa 1966–70;
With Alan Jacobs, London, 1975, from whom acquired until sold
Anonymous sale ('The Property of a Lady'), London, Sotheby's, 3 July 1997, lot 41, where acquried by the present owner.

Exhibited

Düsseldorf, Künstlerverein Malkasten, Gemälde alter Meister, 23 October – 6 November 1966, no. 34 (exhibited by Alfred Brod).

Literature

Possibly C. Hofstede de Groot, A catalogue raisonné..., vol. IV, London 1912, p. 225, cat. no. 712c;
S. Slive, Jacob van Ruisdael, A complete catalogue of his paintings, drawings and etchings, New Haven and London 2001, pp. 273–74, cat. no. 344, reproduced in colour.

Catalogue Note

Jacob van Ruisdael had an instinctive feeling for trees and woods. From his very earliest paintings dated to the mid-1640s he concentrated on the countryside near his native Haarlem: crowded woodland with sandy footpaths and tangled trees set in thickets with dense underbrush, often near the edge of a pond or stream, as we see here. By the 1650s, Ruisdael's woodland compositions are no longer opaque and overcrowded; he freed himself from cramped views by stressing large motifs and introducing sharp light accents to better the legibility of the scene.

Slive dates this bucolic scene to the early 1650s and notes that in old photographs there were traces of an uncharacteristic monogram and date visible at the base of the trunk of the large tree – an unusual place for a signature and date on a work by Ruisdael. The date was read as 1671, an improbable date for the landscape. The monogram and date had, Slive notes, vanished by the time the painting was examined in 1970.1

1 Slive 2001, p. 274.

Old Masters Day Sale

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