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JUMP TO LOT
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Modern & Post-War British Art

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London

Keith Vaughan
1912-1977
FRUIT PICKERS
signed and dated /1949
charcoal, crayon and gouache on paper laid on card
67 by 99cm.; 26¼ by 39in.
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Provenance

Acquired by the present owner, circa 1995 

Catalogue Note

We are grateful to Gerard Hastings, whose new book on Keith Vaughan’s graphic art is to be published later in the year by Pagham Press in Association with the Keith Vaughan Society, for his kind assistance with the catalouging of the present work, and for compiling the catalogue essay.

Although this painting has the freshness of a sketch, Vaughan has signed it as a finished work. Much of the pictorial interest lies in being able to see the artist’s working method. Each stage of the painting’s progress is retained in the final image. For example, the arms of the figure at the right simultaneously reach up to pick fruit and, in another position, hold them in his hands. Similarly the tree at the left can be seen through the torso of the figure standing in front of it.

The subject of figures in an orchard picking fruit, or in a landscape reaching up to branches, occurs frequently in Vaughan’s painting at this time, (see Figures Climbing Trees, 1946, Figure Beneath a Tree Branch, 1947, Man Gathering Fruit, 1948 and Water Trees and Figures, 1948). He worked on the land as a non-combatant for the duration of the war, Vaughan was interested in the themes of man linked to his environment, the changing seasons and farmers harvesting produce.

Having been cut off from artistic developments on the continent during the war, like all British painters Vaughan visited the Picasso/Matisse exhibition at the Victoria and Albert in 1945. We can see the effect Matisse’s work had on him in the arching, curves and linear construction of the forms.

Modern & Post-War British Art

|
London