14
14
Edward East
A RARE SILVER VERGE WATCH IN THE FORM OF A ROSEBUD CIRCA 1640
Estimate
10,00015,000
LOT SOLD. 15,000 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
14
Edward East
A RARE SILVER VERGE WATCH IN THE FORM OF A ROSEBUD CIRCA 1640
Estimate
10,00015,000
LOT SOLD. 15,000 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Masterworks of Time: George Daniels, Visionary

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London

Edward East
A RARE SILVER VERGE WATCH IN THE FORM OF A ROSEBUD CIRCA 1640
Movement: gilded full plate, verge escapement, decoratively pierced and floral engraved pinned-on balance cock, plain flat steel balance, wheel and click set-up with similarly decorated screwed-on balance cock and foot, fusee and gut line, Egyptian pillars • movement signed Eduardus East Fecit
Dial: silver, chapter ring engraved with Roman numerals with half-hour divisions between, inner ring with quarter hour divisions, centre engraved with a townscape, dial edge engraved with flowers and foliage, blued steel floriate hand 
Case: silver, the back of rosebud-form against a matted ground, front cover probably later glazed, bud-form pendant, winding aperture to case back
Accompaniments: with a later associated lyre-form key
diameter 33mm
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Catalogue Note

A watch with a very similar rosebud-form case was in the collection of Stanley Burton, that watch, signed by Francis Torado a watchmaker working in London (Free of the Clockmakers’ Company 1633), was acquired by Burton from Christie’s in 1967 and is illustrated in Antiquarian Horology, June 2002, p.653. A further rosebud-form watch was in the Mallet collection and is illustrated in Baillie, Watches - Their History Decoration and Mechanism, (1929) p. 126. The latter watch was signed by Edmund Gilpin (Free 1632).

Without question one of the most important of early English watchmakers, Edward East was born in Southill, Bedfordshire in 1602. At the time there was no Clockmakers’ Company and so, in 1618, the young East was apprenticed to Richard Roger of the Goldsmiths’ Company, becoming a Freeman in 1627. In 1631 the Clockmakers’ Company was formed by Royal Charter and Edward East became one of the Company’s first assistants a year later, in 1632. East was made Warden of the Clockmakers’ Company in 1638 and Master in both 1645 and 1653. In 1660 he was appointed chief clockmaker to King Charles II. In October 1692, East gave £100 to the Clockmakers’ Company with the interest to be used to support poor members. See Loomes, The Early Clockmakers of Great Britain, 1981, p. 206. Edward East lived through almost the entire 17th century and died in 1697, leaving an extraordinary legacy of exceptional watches and clocks.

Masterworks of Time: George Daniels, Visionary

|
London