24
24
Jan Frans van Bloemen, called l'Orizzonte
A CLASSICAL LANDSCAPE WITH THE COLOSSEUM AND OTHER ROMAN MONUMENTS; A CLASSICAL LANDSCAPE WITH FIGURES RESTING BEFORE A LAKE, A CASTLE BEYOND
24
Jan Frans van Bloemen, called l'Orizzonte
A CLASSICAL LANDSCAPE WITH THE COLOSSEUM AND OTHER ROMAN MONUMENTS; A CLASSICAL LANDSCAPE WITH FIGURES RESTING BEFORE A LAKE, A CASTLE BEYOND

Details & Cataloguing

Inspired by Chatsworth: A Selling Exhibition

New York

Jan Frans van Bloemen, called l'Orizzonte
ANTWERP 1662 - 1749 ROME
A CLASSICAL LANDSCAPE WITH THE COLOSSEUM AND OTHER ROMAN MONUMENTS; A CLASSICAL LANDSCAPE WITH FIGURES RESTING BEFORE A LAKE, A CASTLE BEYOND
SOLD

both oil on canvas
each: 38 1/2  by 46 3/4   in.; 98 by 119 cm.
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Provenance

Acquired by Don Antonio Villacieros y Benito, Conde de Villacieros, probably when serving in the Spanish Embassy in Rome around 1940-50;
Thence by descent through two generations to the present owner.

Catalogue Note

Jan Frans van Bloemen was the leading painter of views of the Roman campagna during the late 17th and first half of the 18th century. Born in Antwerp, he travelled to Rome with his brother Pieter van Bloemen and is recorded there by 1688. He would remain in Rome for the remainder his life, except for a few trips to Naples, Sicily and Malta, and enjoyed the patronage of leading Roman families, including the Doria, Pallavicini, Rospigliosi and Corsini, as well as Isabella Farnese, Queen of Spain, and the Pope.

Van Bloemen’s arcadian depictions of the Roman countryside were also in great demand from English Grand Tourists and many of his works came to England, including a set of landscapes acquired in Rome by 1715 by the 1st Earl of Leicester, still at Holkham Hall today, and a series of paintings now in the collection of the National Trust at Stourhead, Wiltshire.

Although Van Bloemen was more interested in capturing the atmosphere of the Roman campagna rather than being topographically accurate, many of his paintings include familiar Roman monuments, such as the distinctive Roman colosseum which dominates the distance of one of the present scenes; a similar view is repeated in an oval painting by the artist in the Palazzo Ruspoli, Rome.1 The present scenes are particularly fine examples of the artist’s work and come to the market for the first time in well over half a century.

1 A. Busiri Vici, Orizzonte, Rome 1974, no. 66, reproduced.

Inspired by Chatsworth: A Selling Exhibition

New York