369
369

PROPERTY OF AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTOR

Ferdinand du Puigaudeau
PÊCHEURS À PIED AU COUCHANT
JUMP TO LOT
369

PROPERTY OF AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTOR

Ferdinand du Puigaudeau
PÊCHEURS À PIED AU COUCHANT
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

|
London

Ferdinand du Puigaudeau
1864 - 1930
PÊCHEURS À PIED AU COUCHANT
signed F du Puigaudeau (lower right)
oil on canvas
65 by 50cm., 25 5/8 by 19 5/8 in.
Painted circa 1910.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Sale: Thierry-lannon, Paris, 10th December 2011, lot 732
Purchased at the above sale by the present owner

Exhibited

Pont-Aven, Musée de Pont-Aven, Ferdinand du Puigaudeau, 1998
Morlaix, Musée de Jacobins, F du Puigaudeau, 1998-99

Catalogue Note

In the beginning of 1907, Ferdinand de Puigaudeau moved to a new home in Kervaudu (Le Croisic) along the peninsula of Guérande, where he painted the landscape before him until the end of his life: his garden, the marshes and mills of Brière, the sunsets over the sea, and the poppy fields. The artist’s natural surroundings immediately rekindled his passion for painting, which was further encouraged by the company of other painters including Emile Dezaunay, Alexis de Broca and Donatien Roy. Together with his fellow artists, Puigaudeau would regularly work en plein air. 

Between 1910 and 1914, he would devote his work to the countryside, endlessly painting sunsets on the sea and windmills. And on Sundays, he would welcome local artists and intellectuals to his home. As Mademoiselle du Puigaudeau, the artist’s daughter remembers, ‘There were meetings of educated people who tried to break the monotony of a small fishing harbour by creating the cultural diversions it did not offer’ (quoted in Antoine Laurentin, Ferdinand du Puigaudeau (1864-1930), Paris, 1989, p. 104).

In the present work, Puigaudeau uses his knowledge of Impressionism to benefit his love for light. He manipulates all the elements of his painting to accentuate the sun, which the artist renders as an almost sacred star that pulls all depicted elements towards it. Serving as the work's vanishing point, the sun exudes a Pointillist aura that captures the eye of the viewer through its unquestionable brilliance. With this resplendent work, Puigaudeau allows us to contemplate the infinite possibilities of nature with the help of his sublime ocean and dazzling sun.

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

|
London