458
458

PROPERTY OF A PRINCE

Pierre-Auguste Renoir
PAYSAGE, MAISON DE LA POSTE
Estimate
150,000250,000
LOT SOLD. 275,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
458

PROPERTY OF A PRINCE

Pierre-Auguste Renoir
PAYSAGE, MAISON DE LA POSTE
Estimate
150,000250,000
LOT SOLD. 275,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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Pierre-Auguste Renoir
1841 - 1919
PAYSAGE, MAISON DE LA POSTE
Signed Renoir (lower right)
Oil on canvas
7 1/2 by 12 3/4 in.
19.2 by 32 cm
Painted circa 1910-12.
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This work will be included in the forthcoming Renoir Digital Catalogue raisonné, currently being prepared under the sponsorship of the Wildenstein Plattner Institute, Inc.

Provenance

Ambroise Vollard, Paris (acquired from the artist before 1919)
Private Collection, Switzerland (and sold: Sotheby's, London, June 29, 1994, lot 117)
Acquired at the above sale

Literature

Ambroise Vollard, Tableaux, pastels et dessins de Pierre-Auguste Renoir, vol. II, Paris, 1918, illustrated pl. 135
Ambroise Vollard, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Paintings, Pastels and Drawings, San Francisco, 1989, fig. 1474, illustrated p. 303
Guy-Patrice & Michel Dauberville, Renoir, Catalogue raisonné des tableaux, pastels, dessins et aquarelles, 1911-1919, vol. V, Paris, 2014, no. 3944, illustrated p. 186

Catalogue Note

In 1907, Renoir settled in Cagnes where he bought an old farm called Les Collettes situated in an olive grove, where he moved into with his family in 1908. He was to remain in Les Collettes for the rest of his life. Views of the Mediterranean and mountainous landscapes beyond provided the artist with infinite inspiration. The Cagnes landscape consequently played an important role in Renoir’s work during these years, as John House notes, “the estate provided him with his principal subjects for landscape; he focused sometimes on the panoramic view of it from the coast and the old town of Cagnes, sometimes on its ancient, twisting olive trees, and often on the old farmhouse on the estate” (John House, Renoir (exhibition catalogue), Hayward Gallery, London, 1985, p. 276). In a 1918 interview with the art critic René Gimpel the artist commented: “The olive tree, what a brute! If you realize how much trouble it has caused me. A tree full of colours. Not great at all. Its little leaves, how they’ve made me sweat! A gust of wind, and my tree’s tonality changes. The colour isn’t on the leaves, but in the spaces between them. I know that I can’t paint nature, but I enjoy struggling with it. A painter can’t be great if he doesn’t understand landscape” (quoted in ibid., p. 277).

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