420
420

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION

Francisco Zúñiga
JUCHITECA DE PIE
Estimate
100,000150,000
JUMP TO LOT
420

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION

Francisco Zúñiga
JUCHITECA DE PIE
Estimate
100,000150,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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New York

Francisco Zúñiga
1912 - 1998
JUCHITECA DE PIE
Inscribed Zúñiga and dated 1985
Marble
Height: 43 1/4 in.
110 cm
Executed in 1985.
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We wish to thank Ariel Zúñiga for his kind assistance in confirming the authenticity of this work.

Provenance

Galerie Charpentier, Paris
Private Collection (acquired from the above and sold: Christie's, New York, May 18, 1988, lot 28) 
Private Collection (acquired from the above and sold: Christie's, New York, November 16, 1994, lot 38)
Private Collection, Mexico
Acquired from the above 

Exhibited

Paris, Galerie Charpentier, Francisco Zúñiga, Sculptures et dessins, 1986, no. 21, illustrated in the catalogue 

Literature

Fundación Zúñiga, Francisco Zúñiga, Catálogo Razonado/Catalogue Raisonné, Volumen I/Volume I, Escultura/Sculpture, Mexico City, 1991, no. 460, illustrated p. 285

Catalogue Note

Francisco Zúñiga, originally from Guatemala, found in Mexico City the beating cultural heart of the region, an epicenter of modern life built on top of the greatest ancient city in North America, the Aztec capital Tenochtitlan. Although he admired and studied the technical achievements of nineteenth- and twentieth-century masters, particularly Rodin and Moore, in his mature production he pivoted away from the dominant influence of the Western sculptural canon, looking instead to pre-Columbian sculpture for inspiration. He described his entrancing experiences upon arriving in Mexico in a letter to a friend: “I spent most of my days in the Museum of History and Archaeology; I went to the museum every day to study and draw. I was enraptured by the works in stone, with something akin to fear and enchantment, and I began to study them one by one …In those days, I could touch the works, differentiating every texture. Today, you cannot do this. I studied every porous stone, the highly polished textures, their forms; they had the coldness of steel” (Sheldon Reich, Francisco Zúñiga, Sculptor: Conversations and Interpretations, Tucson, 1980, p. 14). This formative, mystical experience awakened Zúñiga’s desire to connect to the past through careful observation of nature, to seek timeless beauty in the eternal medium of bronze. He would go on to monumentalize not the lithe athletes of classical antiquity, but the strength of Mexico’s indigenous women.

In Juchiteca de pie, the influence of both Henry Moore's sleek, modern bodies and the angular, reverently gleaming forms of Olmec sculpture are evident. The soft, realistic details in her face however suggest that, characteristically of this period, Juchiteca de pie is sculpted from life; Zúñiga selected models not only for beauty but for their vitality. At once a naturalistic, emotive portrait and an icon of indigenous strength, this timeless figure gazes stoically ahead to the future. Zúñiga monumentalizes “hieratical… mestiza women—beings whose nation has lived and continues to live between greatness and misery, between hope and despair, people who… believe in…  the breath of life that animates them and in the elementary realities of human existence: children, bread, the sun that touches the skin” (Francisco Zúñiga & Carlos Echeverría, Francisco Zúñiga, Mexico City, 1980, p. 25).

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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New York