386
386

PROPERTY FROM THE WILLIAM LOUIS-DREYFUS FOUNDATION & FAMILY COLLECTIONS

Julio González
PERSONNAGE ALLONGÉ II
Estimate
120,000180,000
LOT SOLD. 187,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT
386

PROPERTY FROM THE WILLIAM LOUIS-DREYFUS FOUNDATION & FAMILY COLLECTIONS

Julio González
PERSONNAGE ALLONGÉ II
Estimate
120,000180,000
LOT SOLD. 187,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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Julio González
1876 - 1942
PERSONNAGE ALLONGÉ II
Inscribed J. Gonzalez © and with the foundry mark E. Godard Fondr and numbered 8/8 
Bronze
Length: 14 1/2 in.
36.8 cm
Conceived circa 1936 and cast in a numbered edition of 8 plus 2, plus 1 épreuve d'artiste and 1 hors commerce cast.
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The authenticity of this work has been confirmed by Philippe Grimminger.

Provenance

Private Collection, Paris
Galerie de France, Paris (acquired by 1987)
Paco Rebés, Barcelona
Private Collection, Europe (and sold: Christie's, London, February 8, 2012, lot 444)
Acquired by William Louis-Dreyfus for the Louis-Dreyfus Family Collections at the above sale

Literature

Vincente Aguilera Cerni, Julio González, Rome, 1962, illustration of another cast pl. LVI
Vicente Aguilera Cerni, González, Itinerario de una dinastía, Barcelona, 1978, illustration of the iron version p. 281
Josephine Withers, Julio González, Sculpture in Iron, New York, 1978, illustration of the iron version p. 82
Jörn Merkert, Julio González, Catalogue raisonné des sculptures, Milan, 1987, no. 208, illustration of the iron version p. 226

Catalogue Note

Born into a family of metalsmiths in Barcelona, González began an apprenticeship at the age of 15. González's artistic output was limited to decorative works until fellow Catalan Pablo Picasso sought his help in executing six large-scale sculptures between 1928-31. During this time, González not only taught Picasso the basic techniques of working with metal, but began to explore the application of these methods in his own artistic practice using the skills of a craft with which he was so familiar.

It is thus no understatement that González, more so than any artist, fundamentally altered the trajectory of modern metal sculpture. Since Antiquity, sculptors in the Western tradition had to first mold their idea in a malleable material such as plaster or wax and then enlist the help of a professional foundry to transform their model into a more permanent medium. González realized the aesthetic possibilities afforded by directly manipulating the form of metals, paving the way for artists such as David Smith and John Chamberlain.

Personnage allongé II dates from one of the most productive periods of González's career, when he produced a series masterpieces in iron following his collaboration with Picasso. The present work is an elegant construction of abstract geometric forms that plays on the disparity between the mechanistic abstraction of the material and its figurative subject.

Despite his artistic breakthroughs and stunning creations, González was never interested in pursuing commercial success. He remained committed to providing for his family and was a quiet, religious man. He allowed very limited access to his studio, though he held optimistic beliefs of what artists could achieve with iron: "The age of iron began many centuries ago, by producing (unhappily) arms—some very beautiful. Today it makes possible the building of bridges, railroads. It is high time that this metal cease to be a murderer and the simple instrument of an overly mechanical science. Today, the door is opened wide to this material to be at last forged and hammered by the peaceful hands of artists" (quoted in Julio González, A Retrospective (exhibition catalogue), Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, 1993, p. 15)

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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New York