364
364
Max Ernst
REMOUS
Estimate
400,000600,000
JUMP TO LOT
364
Max Ernst
REMOUS
Estimate
400,000600,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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New York

Max Ernst
1891 - 1976
REMOUS
Signed max ernst (lower right)
Oil on canvas
25 5/8 by 21 1/4 in.
65.1 by 54 cm
Painted in 1925.
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Dr. Jürgen Pech has confirmed the authenticity of this work.

Provenance

Galerie Daniel Malingue, Paris (acquired by 1982)
Private Collection, Monaco
Sale: Guy Loudmer, Paris, June 21, 1993, lot 32
Acquired at the above sale by the present owner

Exhibited

Brühl, Max Ernst Museum, Schausammlung im Wechsel, 2006, n.n.
Sète, Musée Paul Valéry, Max Ernst-Yves Tanguy: Deux visions du surréalisme, 2016, n.n., illustrated in color in the catalogue

Literature

Sarane Alexandrian, Max Ernst, Paris, 1986, illustrated in color p. 119

Catalogue Note

The present work is part of the La Mer series which Ernst painted around 1925 in the seaside town of Pornic in Brittany, which inspired the marine aesthetic of the series. It was here that Ernst developed his technique of frottage, one of the most consequential inventions of his career. As Werner Spies explained, “Max Ernst himself, in his essay ‘Au-delà de la peinture,’ has traced the origin of the frottage technique to a definite time and place. It was the well-worn floorboards of a small hotel in Pornic on the Atlantic coast of France, where he was staying in 1925, that provided him with a basic pattern richly textured and lending itself to further development. He laid sheets of paper over the floorboards and rubbed them with a soft black pencil, so that the underlying pattern showed through. Thanks to the combination of the most varied textures with distinct relief effects, he enriched this fund of forms and worked them up into well-defined drawings. In addition to boards, the elements employed include straw-plaiting, stale bread, twine, cherry stems, leaves and bark” (Werner Spies, Max Ernst Frottagen, Stuttgart, 1968, n.p.; translated from German). This technique resulted in fantastical images through what Ernst called his “voyages of discovery,” and incorporated elements of chance and automatism, key concepts in Surrealist thought. In the subsequent years, Ernst would expand his frottage technique into the use of oil paint, which would come to visually define his oeuvre in works such as Forêt et colombe (see fig. 1).

Fig. 1 Max Ernst, Forêt et colombe, 1927, oil on canvas, Tate Modern, London

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