348
348

PROPERTY FROM A SAN FRANCISCO PRIVATE COLLECTION

Pablo Picasso
POISSON EN PROFIL
Estimate
50,00070,000
LOT SOLD. 106,250 USD
JUMP TO LOT
348

PROPERTY FROM A SAN FRANCISCO PRIVATE COLLECTION

Pablo Picasso
POISSON EN PROFIL
Estimate
50,00070,000
LOT SOLD. 106,250 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

|
New York

Pablo Picasso
1881 - 1973
POISSON EN PROFIL
Stamped indistinctly Madoura plein feu and Empreinte original de Picasso (on the reverse)
Painted and glazed ceramic; oval plate
Length: 12 5/8 in.
32.1 cm
Executed in 1951; this is a unique version of the empreinte.
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Claude Picasso has confirmed the authenticity of this work.

Provenance

Mrs. Jacob Freidus, New York
David Gould, London
Private Collection, California
Acquired from the above in 2010

Exhibited

Fayetteveille, North Carolina, McCune Gallery, Methodist University & traveling, Picasso, 25 Years of Edition Ceramics from the Rosenbaum Collection, 2014, n.n., illustrated in color in the catalogue

Catalogue Note

The present work is the unique ceramic, created by Picasso, which the potters in Madoura used to create a later edition of 25 examples.

Picasso incorporated animals into his earliest drawings as a young student in Spain. As an adult, his menagerie of pets included a goat which roamed his estate grounds, an owl with whom he shared his studio and a faithful dachshund he affectionately named Lump. Each of these characters provided subject matter and inspiration for Picasso’s work. From those beasts that inhabited his studio, to the bullfighting rings he regularly visited, to the marine life found in the nearby Mediterranean, the animal world provided consistent inspiration for creative exploration in both two and three dimensions.

Beginning in the 1920s and 1930s, Picasso made a habit of spending the summers with his family on the Côte d’Azur, where the landscape and culture reminded him of his upbringing along the Catalan coast. During one such trip in the summer of 1946, Picasso by chance discovered ceramics as a new outlet for his creative impulse during a visit to the Madoura Pottery of Suzanne and Georges Ramié. Motivated partially by his enthusiasm for working with clay, Picasso began to spend more and more time near Vallauris, acquiring a villa there in 1949.

Picasso’s ceramics from this period are filled with imagery of animals both natural and mythological, as he worked to transform, quite literally, earth into art. The present work captures Picasso’s love for the creatures of the Mediterranean, which he imbues with a whimsy and playfulness that characterize his greatest works in clay.

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

|
New York