226
226

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION, CHICAGO

Henri Matisse
TÊTE DE MARGUERITE
Estimate
250,000350,000
LOT SOLD. 412,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT
226

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION, CHICAGO

Henri Matisse
TÊTE DE MARGUERITE
Estimate
250,000350,000
LOT SOLD. 412,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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Henri Matisse
1869 - 1954
TÊTE DE MARGUERITE
Stamped with the raised signature HM and with the foundry mark C. Valsuani Cire Perdue and numbered 0/10
Bronze
Height: 12 5/8  in.
32.1 cm
Conceived in 1915 cast in bronze in a numbered edition of 11 between 1930-54; this example cast circa 1930 by the Valsuani Foundry, Paris.
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Provenance

Estate of the artist
Edward Tyler Nahem Fine Art, New York
Acquired from the above in May 2002

Exhibited

Brussels, Palais des Beaux-Arts, Henri Matisse: Dessins et sculpture, 1975, no. 203, illustrated in the catalogue

Literature

Alfred H. Barr, Matisse, His Art and His Public, New York, 1951, illustration of another cast p. 401
Mario Luzi & Massimo Carrà, L'Opera di Matisse, dalla Rivolta Fauve all'Intimismo, Milan, 1971, no. S17, illustration of another cast p. 108
Albert E. Elsen, The Sculpture of Henri Matisse, New York, 1972, illustrations of another cast pp. 136 & 137
Isabelle Monod-Fontaine, The Sculpture of Henri Matisse, London, 1984, no. 51, illustration of another cast p. 147
Jack Flam, Matisse, The Man and His Art, 1869-1918, New York, 1986, illustration of another cast p. 189
Claude Duthuit, Henri Matisse: Catalogue raisonné de l'oeuvre sculpté, Paris, 1997, no. 58, illustrations of another cast pp. 164-65 & 167

Catalogue Note

Matisse was open about his lack of preference when it came to medium. He liked to sculpt as much as to paint and thought highly of his work in bronze to the extent that sculptures often outnumbered the framed works hanging on the walls of his exhibitions. The discoveries he made working in clay would often help to inform his painting, and indeed, even Alfred Barr believed that if Matisse were survived only by his sculptures, their quality would assure his standing as a major artist.

In the present portrait of his twenty-one year-old daughter, Marguerite, the narrow face and bust that turns into a truncated stele have prompted comparisons with the iconic bronzes of Giacometti, though the sculpture pre-dates Giacometti's attenuated pieces by thirty years. Interestingly, these narrow proportions are not reflected in the two painted portraits of Marguerite done in 1916 and 1917, both frontal studies, suggesting perhaps that sculpture allowed a greater examination of profile and animated modeling. “Viewing the sculpture from both sides suggests that Matisse was making two profile studies of his daughter; one with the right eye closed, the other with the left eye open,” writes Albert Elsen. “Asymmetry was a crucial means for individualizing his subjects in portraiture, and in The Head of Marguerite it also gives him the opportunity of presenting his subject in two different moods” (Albert Elsen, The Sculpture of Henri Matisse, New York, 1972, p. 136).

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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New York