216
216
Albert Marquet
PONT DE BLACKFRIARS, LONDRES
Estimate
150,000250,000
JUMP TO LOT
216
Albert Marquet
PONT DE BLACKFRIARS, LONDRES
Estimate
150,000250,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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New York

Albert Marquet
1875 - 1947
PONT DE BLACKFRIARS, LONDRES
Signed marquet (lower right)
Oil on canvas
19 5/8 by 23 7/8 in.
49.8 by 60.6 cm
Painted in 1907. 
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This work is accompanied by an Attestation of Inclusion from the Wildenstein Institute, and it will be included in the forthcoming Marquet Digital Catalogue Raisonné, currently being prepared under the sponsorship of the Wildenstein Plattner Institute, Inc.

Provenance

Galerie Druet, Paris (acquired from the artist in February 1908)
Private Collection, France
Galerie Druet, Paris (acquired in 1911)
Jean-Albert Grégoire, Switzerland
Sale: Guy Loudmer, Paris, June 21, 1993, lot 34
Acquired at the above sale by the present owner

Exhibited

Paris, Salon d'Automne, 1907, no. 1748
Paris, Galerie Druet, Marquet, 1910, no. 48

Literature

Marcel Giry, Le Fauvisme, Neuchâtel, 1981, illustrated p. 202

Catalogue Note

Unusual among his contemporaries, Albert Marquet was actively encouraged by his family to pursue a career in painting. He enrolled in the École national des arts décoratifs in 1892 where he became acquainted with Henri Matisse. Later, during his time at the École des Beaux-Arts, he met Henri Manguin and Charles Camoin. Together these artists would go on to form the Fauve movement, which took the Parisian art world by storm at the 1905 Salon d'Automne, where critic Louis Vauxcelles' disapproving description of their daringly colorful work as the output of "les fauves"—wild beasts—gave the group their revolutionary moniker. 

Painted at the height of Marquet's Fauve period, Pont de Blackfriars, Londres is one of a series of London cityscapes that he made throughout his career. Marquet's serial exploration of views of the city directly echoes the Impressionists' atmospheric urban landscapes. His interest in depicting the Thames, in particular, is illustrative of his lifelong affinity for bodies of water. During his well-traveled career, Marquet and his easel regularly gravitated toward such locations, from the ports of Rotterdam to the coastlines of North Africa to settlements along the Bosphorus.

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

|
New York