214
214
Raoul Dufy
MARINE
Estimate
350,000450,000
JUMP TO LOT
214
Raoul Dufy
MARINE
Estimate
350,000450,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

|
New York

Raoul Dufy
1877 - 1953
MARINE
Stamped R Dufy (toward lower right)
Oil on canvas
21 1/4 by 25 5/8 in.
54.1 by 65 cm
Painted circa 1905.
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Fanny Guillon-Laffaille has kindly confirmed that this work will be included in the second supplement of the Catalogue raisonné de l'Oeuvre peint de Raoul Dufy currently in preparation.

Provenance

Wilhelm Speth, Belgium (acquired circa 1920)
Private Collection, Belgium (by descent from the above)
Acquired from the above by the present owner

Catalogue Note

Dufy believed that the decisive turning point in his career occurred at the Salon d’Automne of 1905, where he saw Matisse’s Fauve masterpiece Luxe, calme et volupté. At that point Dufy claimed: “I understood the new raison d’être of painting and impressionist realism lost its charm for me as I beheld this miracle of the creative imagination at play, in color and drawing” (quoted in Jacques Lassaigne, Dufy, New York, 1954, p. 22). Dufy began incorporating the bright hues favored by the Fauves, but softened his palette with pastel shades of pink, pale blue, lavender and yellow. The year following this encounter proved seminal for Dufy, who exhibited in both the Salon des Indépendants and the Salon d’Automne, in addition to holding his first solo show at the gallery of Berthe Weill in Paris.

As Alvin Martin and Judi Freeman write: “What distinguished the work of the Fauves from Le Havre (Dufy, Friesz and Braque) from that of Matisse and company was the treatment of surface and color. Whereas the Norman artists have been steadfastly loyal to the Impressionist approach to painting, Matisse, Derain, Vlaminck and the others borrowed extensively from the far more audacious generation that succeeded the Impressionists. The Norman Fauves found irresistible the full-blown Fauve manner of painting, characterized by highly saturated color and the laying in of brilliant tones side by side, and they inevitably responded to it in their own work, produced back in their native Normandy” (Alvin Martin & Judi Freeman, “The Distant Cousins in Normandy: Braque, Dufy and Friesz,” in The Fauve Landscape, New York, 1990, pp. 221-22).

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

|
New York