141
141

EVERYTHING YOU CAN IMAGINE IS REAL: PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE EUROPEAN COLLECTION

Marc Chagall
LE COLPORTEUR
Estimate
100,000150,000
JUMP TO LOT
141

EVERYTHING YOU CAN IMAGINE IS REAL: PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE EUROPEAN COLLECTION

Marc Chagall
LE COLPORTEUR
Estimate
100,000150,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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New York

Marc Chagall
1887 - 1985
LE COLPORTEUR
Signed Marc Chagall and dated 1911 (lower left)
Gouache and charcoal on paper
12 3/8 by 7 3/4 in.
31.5 by 19.6 cm
Executed in 1911.
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The authenticity of this work has kindly been confirmed by the Comité Chagall.

Provenance

Mrs. E. Solomon (and sold by the estate: Sotheby's, London, December 3, 1986, lot 429)
Private Collection, Paris (acquired at the above sale)
Private Collection, New York
Sale: Christie's, London, November 28, 1989, lot 132
Acquired at the above sale

Exhibited

London, Ben Uri Gallery, Fortieth Anniversary Exhibition, 1956, no. 13
Paris, Galerie Gerald Piltzer, Chagall: Vitebsk, St. Petersbourg, Paris, 1993, illustrated in color in the catalogue
Bern, Museum of Fine Arts, Marc Chagall, 1907-1917, 1995-96, no. 138, illustrated in color in the catalogue (titled The Peddler)

Catalogue Note

Following his studies in St. Petersburg, the young Chagall won a scholarship to Paris in 1910, and soon moved to La Ruche, one of the city’s most extraordinary Cités d’artistes. Situated behind the abattoirs of Paris, this twelve-sided building with its hidden garden housed 140 studios which were filled with young painters, sculptors, poets and bohemians from all over the world. This was to prove a seminal experience in his artistic development, as his stay brought him into contact with luminaries such as Léger, Laurens, Soutine and Modigliani, and their wider circle of acquaintances, including the poets Blaise Cendrars, Max Jacob and Guillaume Apollinaire.

Despite his contact with these avant-garde artists, Chagall's work remained suffused with folkloric imagery from his childhood in Vitebsk. The figure of the peddler, with a sack full of wares on his back, is central among these. In this exceptional early gouache, Chagall employs his characteristic blocks of vivid color to create a charming image of the vendor. A few years later, Chagall would modernize the figure of the traditional Jewish peddler in his seminal work, Le Marchand de journaux, which served as an allegory for the sorrows of World War I (see fig. 1).

"Chagall's great lyrical breakthrough came around 1911. This is the moment when metaphor, with him alone, made its triumphal appearance in modern painting. In order to complete the deconstruction of spatial planes that had been prepared by Rimbaud and at the same time free the object from the laws of weight and gravity, breaking down the barrier between elements and kingdoms." —André Breton, Le Surréalisme et la Peinture, 1928

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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New York