117
117

PROPERTY OF A GENTLEMAN

Gustave Caillebotte
FALAISE EN NORMANDIE
Estimate
800,0001,200,000
JUMP TO LOT
117

PROPERTY OF A GENTLEMAN

Gustave Caillebotte
FALAISE EN NORMANDIE
Estimate
800,0001,200,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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New York

Gustave Caillebotte
1848 - 1894
FALAISE EN NORMANDIE
Stamped g. Caillebotte. (lower left)
Oil on canvas
32 by 25 5/8  in.
81.2 by 65.2 cm
Painted circa 1880-81. 
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The authenticity of this work has been confirmed by the Comité Caillebotte.

Provenance

Estate of the artist
Private Collection, France (by descent from the above)
Acquired from the above

Exhibited

Lausanne, Fondation de l'Hermitage, Caillebotte au coeur de l'impressionisme, 2005, no. 51, illustrated in color in the catalogue
Bremen, Kunsthalle Bremen; Copenhagen, Ordrupgaard & Madrid, Museo Nacional Thyssen-Bornemisza, Gustave Caillebotte, 2008-09, no. 31, illustrated in color in the catalogue (with incorrect dimensions)

Literature

Marie Berhaut, La Vie et l’oeuvre de Gustave Caillebotte, Paris, 1951, no. 115, illustrated n.p.
Marie Berhaut, Caillebotte, Sa vie et son oeuvre: Catalogue raisonné des peintures et pastels, Paris, 1978, no. 163, illustrated p. 137 (titled Falaise à Villiers-sur-mer and with incorrect dimensions)
Marie Berhaut, Gustave Caillebotte: Catalogue raisonné des peintures et pastels, Paris, 1994, no. 177, illustrated p. 142 (with incorrect dimensions)

Catalogue Note

Falaise en Normandie is one of Caillebotte's earliest views of Normandy, an area he first visited in June 1880 and returned to every summer in subsequent years. A keen sailor, he participated in the regattas along the Channel and painted coastal views and holiday villas at Villers-sur-Mer, Trouville and Honfleur. Easily reached by train from Paris, Trouville had become a fashionable summer retreat for the French aristocracy by the late nineteenth century. Normandy's landscapes are almost synonymous with Impressionism's early years. By choosing this location for his subject matter, Caillebotte followed in the footsteps of Boudin, who painted there in the 1860s and 1870s. In his own work, however, Caillebotte turned away from the fashionably dressed visitors that dominated Boudin’s compositions and, like his contemporary Monet, focused on the landscape of the region.

The colorful landscapes Caillebotte painted at this time resemble, in their spirit, the canvases Monet was painting at nearby Étretat and Pourville (see fig. 2). These paintings mark a shift in the artist's creative output, which perhaps coincided with the rift among the Impressionists when Caillebotte criticized Degas for not showing the paintings he had promised, and for allowing new recruits to show work Caillebotte felt was inferior. The crisp compositions he had painted in Paris are replaced by loose, nature-based landscapes. In the present work the animated brushwork highlighting the movement of the waterfall jetting from the cliff, in addition to the clearly fleeting weather conditions, manifest a truly Impressionist vision. 

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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New York