367
367

PROPERTY FROM A DISTINGUISHED PRIVATE COLLECTION

Edgar Degas
DANSEUSE
Estimate
200,000300,000
LOT SOLD. 250,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
367

PROPERTY FROM A DISTINGUISHED PRIVATE COLLECTION

Edgar Degas
DANSEUSE
Estimate
200,000300,000
LOT SOLD. 250,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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New York

Edgar Degas
1834 - 1917
DANSEUSE
Signed Degas (lower left)
Charcoal and pastel on paper
11 7/8 by 9 1/2 in.
30 by 24.1 cm
Executed circa 1880. 
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Provenance

Jeanne Fèvre, Nice (the artist's niece; and sold: Galerie Charpentier, Paris, June 12, 1934, lot 100)
Private Collection (acquired circa the 1950s)
Thence by descent

Literature

Paul-André Lemoisne, Degas et son oeuvre, vol. II, Paris, 1946, no. 604, illustrated p. 343

Catalogue Note

Degas made several studies of dancers in groups of three around 1880, depicting his subject from both front and behind. The figure in the present work features on the right-hand side of the large-scale pastel, Trois Danseuses, and in terms of her unconventional beauty or jolie-laide qualities, bears similarities to his famous sculpture of La Petite danseuse de quatorze ans, also conceived circa 1880 (see fig. 1).

Far from traditional portraits or voyeuristic studies, Degas' dancers are in a canon of their own. Generally depicted away from the stage during informal moments, the dancers are often portrayed in contorted postures or from an unexpected vantage point. Degas firmly objected the classification as "the painter of dancing girls", explaining that his chief interest lay in rendering the dancer's movements rather than the women themselves, irregardless of whether they were elegantly poised or precariously balanced.

Degas managed to capture the world of the ballet so successfully that few painters have dared to revisit the theme since, and nowhere is his meticulous intensity more evident than in the preparatory studies. “No art is less spontaneous than mine. Everything I do is the outcome of long reflection, of my study of the masters and more besides. A matter of inspiration, temperament, dogged observation” (the artist quoted in Degas (exhibition catalogue), Wildenstein & Co., Inc., New York, 1960, n.p.). 

The 1934 sale of works on paper belonging to Jeanne Fèvre, the artist's niece, has furnished the collections of museums across the world, from The Metropolitan Museum of Art to the National Gallery of Canada and the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge.

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

|
New York