301
301

THE GERALD L. LENNARD FOUNDATION COLLECTION

Jean Arp
NID ENCHANTEUR
Estimate
250,000350,000
LOT SOLD. 400,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
301

THE GERALD L. LENNARD FOUNDATION COLLECTION

Jean Arp
NID ENCHANTEUR
Estimate
250,000350,000
LOT SOLD. 400,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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New York

Jean Arp
1886 - 1966
NID ENCHANTEUR
Inscribed Arp and with the foundry mark E. Godard Fondr. and numbered 1/5 (on the underside)
Bronze
Height: 24 in.
60.9 cm
Conceived in 1963-65 and cast in an edition of 5 between 1972 and 1986. This example was cast in 1972 by the E. Godard Foundry, Paris.
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Provenance

Sidney Janis Gallery, New York
McKee Gallery, New York (acquired by 1981)
Private Collection, California (acquired by 1982)
McKee Gallery, New York
Acquired from the above on February 24, 1994

Literature

Eduard Trier, Marguerite Arp-Hagenbach & François Arp, Jean Arp, Sculpture, His Last Ten Years, New York, 1968, no. 360A, illustration of another cast p. 130
Ionel Jianou, Jean Arp, Paris, 1973, no. 360A, illustration of another cast p. 84
Serge Fauchereau, Arp, Paris, 1988, illustration of another cast p. 100
Arie Hartog & Kai Fischer, Hans Arp, Sculptures, A Critical Survey, Bonn, 2012, no. 360A, illustration of another cast p. 396

Catalogue Note

Nid enchanteur embodies the fully mature biomorphic forms for which Arp had become so renowned by the 1960s. A well-balanced and curvaceous form is puncuated by negative space, in which a small abstracted figure rests in the protective shadow of the bulb. The title of the work, Nid enchanteur or "Enchanting Nest", suggests that it is a symbol of transformation through nurture, the large rounded element creating an environment for the growth of the form within, much like a mother's womb or the human imagination. 

In Arp's own words: "Art is a fruit that grows in man, like a fruit on a plant, or a child in its mother's womb. But whereas the fruits of the plant, of the animal, of the mother's womb assume autonomous and natural forms, art, the spiritual fruit of man, usually resorts to forms that are ridiculously like other things. Only in our time has plastic art freed itself from reproducing mandolins, presidents in cutaway suits, battles or landscapes. I love nature, but not its substitutes. Naturalistic, illusionist art is a substitute" (Jean Arp quoted in Carola Giedion-Welcker, Jean Arp, Stuttgart, 1957, p. XXVII). 

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

|
New York