248
248

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE EUROPEAN COLLECTION

Egon Schiele
ERICH LEDERER, DIE HÄNDE GEFALTET (ERICH LEDERER WITH HANDS CLASPED)
Estimate
250,000350,000
LOT SOLD. 300,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
248

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE EUROPEAN COLLECTION

Egon Schiele
ERICH LEDERER, DIE HÄNDE GEFALTET (ERICH LEDERER WITH HANDS CLASPED)
Estimate
250,000350,000
LOT SOLD. 300,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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New York

Egon Schiele
1890 - 1918
ERICH LEDERER, DIE HÄNDE GEFALTET (ERICH LEDERER WITH HANDS CLASPED)

Provenance

August Lederer, Györ (the sitter’s father; acquired from the artist)
Private Collection (by descent from the above and sold: Sotheby’s, London, June 29, 1994, lot 184)
Private Collection, Europe (Acquired at the above sale)
Thence by descent

Literature

Christian Nebehay, Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele und die Familie Lederer, Bern, 1987, illustrated p. 111 (titled Erich Lederer and dated circa 1915-16)
Jane Kallir, Egon Schiele: The Complete Works, London, 1990, no. D1762, illustrated p. 553

Catalogue Note

The subject of the present work is the fifteen-year-old Erich Lederer, son of the wealthy industrialist and art collectors August and Serena Lederer. Schiele had been introduced to the Lederer family by Gustav Klimt in 1912. They had long been important patrons of the elder artist, whose celebrated portrait of Serena now hangs at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, and Klimt was keen to draw Schiele into this circle. After first introductions, Schiele was invited to spend Christmas at the family’s Hungarian estate; in letters to his mother during this stay he recalls the Lederers’ amazement at his adroit draftsmanship and a commission to paint Erich’s portrait followed shortly after (see fig. 1). It was during the sittings for this painting that Schiele and Erich came to be friends. Erich was also artistic and would often bring his own crayons and paper to work as he sat for his portrait, as Schiele recalled in another letter: "the boy I am painting is 15 years old, with a long aristocratic face. He is a born painter, and draws also" (quoted in Alessandra Comini, Egon Schiele’s Portraits, Berkeley & London, 1974, p. 114).

Although Schiele never attempted another oil of Erich, he continued to draw him on occasion and the present work, executed some three years later, is testament to their enduring friendship. By comparison with the earlier drawings, in Erich Lederer, die Hände gefaltet the sitter has a new maturity, with Schiele deftly capturing a thoughtfulness and self-possession that is not apparent in his previous studies. The present work also reveals a new maturity on the part of the artist; with his characteristic acuity he renders his subject in just a few lines of pencil allowing detail to gather only in the face and hands. This emphasis on his sitter’s features—common in Schiele—and the downward gaze of Erich combine to create a sense of intimacy that speaks to the close relationship of the two young men.

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