799
799

PROPERTY FROM THE JUNKUNC COLLECTION

A TANG-STYLE GILT-BRONZE FIGURE OF A LION
MING DYNASTY  
Estimate
60,00080,000
JUMP TO LOT
799

PROPERTY FROM THE JUNKUNC COLLECTION

A TANG-STYLE GILT-BRONZE FIGURE OF A LION
MING DYNASTY  
Estimate
60,00080,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Chinese Art

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New York

A TANG-STYLE GILT-BRONZE FIGURE OF A LION
MING DYNASTY  
seated on its haunches with its forelegs firmly planted, its head detailed with fierce protruding rounded eyes, thick brows, roaring mouth revealing teeth and sharp fangs, and leaf-shaped ears swept to the back, the long mane falling in luxurious spiraling curls down the neck, the long tail turned upward, the base inscribed with four characters reading baoen (to repay kindness) and xiede (to appreciate virtues)
Height 4 1/4  in., 10.9 cm
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Provenance

Collection of Stephen Junkunc, III (d. 1978).

Catalogue Note

The present lion is modeled after medieval Chinese sculptures of lions, which were principally sculpted in stone and occasionally cast in metal. For a Six Dynasties gilt-bronze precedent of the same size, similarly posed, and holding the tail in the same attitude, see an example in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art (acc. no. 42.25.32). The same collection also includes a Tang dynasty gilt-bronze figure of lion standing foursquare atop a rectangular base (acc. no. 42.25.31).

The modeling of the body, particularly in the chest and the joints in the forelegs, closely follows Tang dynasty lions carved in limestone or marble. See for instance a small white marble carving of a lion, also from the collection of Stephen Junkunc III, sold at Christie's New York, 21st September 1995, lot 300; and a larger example, from the collection of Robert H. Ellsworth, sold at Christie's New York, 17th March 2015, lot 16. Similar in style is a puddingstone example in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art (acc. no. 24.74).

Important Chinese Art

|
New York