670
670

PROPERTY OF A GENTLEMAN

A CEREMONIAL SUIT OF ARMOR WITH HELMET
QING DYNASTY, 19TH CENTURY
Estimate
25,00035,000
LOT SOLD. 40,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
670

PROPERTY OF A GENTLEMAN

A CEREMONIAL SUIT OF ARMOR WITH HELMET
QING DYNASTY, 19TH CENTURY
Estimate
25,00035,000
LOT SOLD. 40,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Chinese Art

|
New York

A CEREMONIAL SUIT OF ARMOR WITH HELMET
QING DYNASTY, 19TH CENTURY
comprising a jacket and apron embroidered overall with a navy blue diaper pattern on a gold filé ground, set with brass studs and trimmed with dark brown velvet, with detachable panels, helmet and gilt metal mounts, with a painted lacquer hat box (15)
Height of armor 63 in., 160 cm
Height of helmet 22 in., 55.9 cm
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Provenance

Collection of Robert Leroy Ripley (1890-1949) of 'Ripley's Believe It or Not' mid-1940s, (by repute).
Sotheby's New York, 23rd March 2004, lot 554.

Catalogue Note

Suits of armor of this type were worn by high-ranking officers during ceremonies when the emperor reviewed his armies to assess their strength and techniques of calvary, archery and combat. Made of satin padded with cotton, trimmed and lined with blue silk, they were covered with gilt studs and embroidered with dragon roundels. According to Valerie M. Garrett in Chinese Clothing: An Illustrated Guide, Oxford, 1994, p. 122, ceremonial suits of armor 'were made in the Imperial workshops in Hangzhou, and when not worn were stored at the Western Gate of the Forbidden City'. 

Compare with an almost identical ceremonial suit of armor, in satin covered with metal studs and embroidered with dragon roundels, in the museo Oriental de Valladoid, illustrated ibid., fig. 11.2; another similar suit of ceremonial armor was sold at Sotheby's London, 13 November 2002, lot 17.

Important Chinese Art

|
New York