625
625

PROPERTY FROM AN AMERICAN PRIVATE COLLECTION

A RARE AND LARGE MOLDED LEMON YELLOW-BACKED FAMILLE-ROSE 'PEACH' BOWL
YONGZHENG MARK AND PERIOD
Estimate
100,000150,000
LOT SOLD. 325,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
625

PROPERTY FROM AN AMERICAN PRIVATE COLLECTION

A RARE AND LARGE MOLDED LEMON YELLOW-BACKED FAMILLE-ROSE 'PEACH' BOWL
YONGZHENG MARK AND PERIOD
Estimate
100,000150,000
LOT SOLD. 325,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Chinese Art

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New York

A RARE AND LARGE MOLDED LEMON YELLOW-BACKED FAMILLE-ROSE 'PEACH' BOWL
YONGZHENG MARK AND PERIOD
the deep rounded sides resting on a straight foot and flaring to an everted rim, the exterior molded at the center with a leafy meandering scroll of peonies, and covered entirely in a bright lemon-yellow enamel, the interior glazed white centering two delicately painted, plump peaches on a leafing branch, shaded in pale yellow and green with accents of pink mottling, the unfurling leaves finely outlined and picked out in teal and apple-green, the recessed base with a six-character mark in underglaze blue within a double circle, wood stand (2)
Diameter 8 3/4  in., 22.1 cm
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Provenance

Collection of John Allyne Gade (1875-1955), and thence by descent.

Catalogue Note

The present bowl triumphantly combines two significant innovations of the Yongzheng period: the famille-rose palette, and lemon-yellow glazes. Technically considered an 'enamel' due to its low-temperature firing requirements, lemon-yellow glaze (ningmeng huang) was applied to a variety of porcelain wares during the Yongzheng reign and is admired for its brilliant, opaque hue. The color is derived from lead antimontate, different from the lead stannate yellow enamels found in the famille-rose palette. 

See two bowls of this type sold at Christie's Hong Kong: the first on 19th March 1991, lot 681, and again 30th November 2016, lot 3317; the second on 20th March 1990, lot 794. A turquoise-glazed example sold in our London rooms, 14th November 2000, lot 169. Compare also two monochrome-glazed bowls of the same form and molding from the collection of Ira and Nancy Koger, sold in these rooms, 27th November 1990: a celadon-glazed example, lot 29, and a white-glazed example, lot 33. A related bowl is illustrated in John Ayers, The Baur Collection: Chinese Ceramics: Painted and Polychrome Ceramics of the Ch'ing Dynasty, vol. IV, pl. A 588, with rounded sides entirely glazed in lemon-yellow, and molded with cranes and peaches with a single famille-rose peach at the interior. A variation with a band of molded archaistic dragons under a translucent warm yellow glaze, sold at Christie's Hong Kong, 19th January 1988, lot 270. 

The present Yongzheng design continued well into the 19th century. Compare a lemon-yellow-glazed Jiaqing seal mark and period example in the collection of the Palace Museum, Beijing, illustrated in The Complete Collection of Treasures of the Palace Museum: Porcelains with Cloisonné Enamel Decoration and Famille-Rose Decoration, vol. 39, Hong Kong, 1999, pl. 179. See also a Daoguang seal mark and period example, sold at Christie's Hong Kong, 17th January 1989, lot 705. 

John Allyne Gade (1875-1955) was an American architect, naval officer, diplomat, investment banker, and author. Born in Massachusetts to a Norwegian father and American mother, Gade spent many of his formative years in Europe, and continued to travel around the continent throughout his career. He likely acquired this bowl during these travels or during his time as Commissioner to three Baltic states. The bowl has remained in his family since his acquisition. 

Important Chinese Art

|
New York