659
659

PROPERTY FROM A DISTINGUISHED NEW YORK PRIVATE COLLECTION

AN ARCHAIC BRONZE RITUAL FOOD VESSEL (DING)
LATE SHANG / EARLY WESTERN ZHOU DYNASTY
Estimate
30,00050,000
LOT SOLD. 32,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT
659

PROPERTY FROM A DISTINGUISHED NEW YORK PRIVATE COLLECTION

AN ARCHAIC BRONZE RITUAL FOOD VESSEL (DING)
LATE SHANG / EARLY WESTERN ZHOU DYNASTY
Estimate
30,00050,000
LOT SOLD. 32,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Chinese Art

|
New York

AN ARCHAIC BRONZE RITUAL FOOD VESSEL (DING)
LATE SHANG / EARLY WESTERN ZHOU DYNASTY
the deep U-shaped body supported on three columnar legs, the flattened everted rim set with two upright loop handles, cast around the body with a diagonal grid comprised of diamond-shapes, each with a leiwen border and central boss, all below a band of confronting kuilong against a leiwen ground beneath the rim, the surface with malachite encrustation
Height 9 7/8  in., 25.3 cm
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Sotheby's New York, 19th September 2001, lot 8. 

Catalogue Note

This type of distinctive 'diamond and boss' decoration appears to have been an innovation of the Anyang bronze foundries and en vogue in the late Shang period. Most often seen on gui and yu, this motif is commonly found on round-bodied vessels. A related ding, of slightly smaller size and with cicadas cast below the rim, excavated in 1970 from Xiaoning tun, Anyang, Henan province, and now in the collection of the Institute of Archaeology, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, Beijing, is illustrated in Zhongguo qingtongqi quanji [Complete collection of Chinese archaic bronzes], vol. 2Beijing, 1997, pl. 26; and a larger version with blades cast onto the legs, in the Avery Brundage Collection, is included in René-Yvon Lefebvre-d’Argencé, Ancient Chinese Bronzes in the Avery Brundage Collection,  Berkeley, 1966, pl. IV (right). See also two related vessels excavated in the late Shang tomb of Fu Hao, a consort of King Wu Ding (r. 1324-1265 BC), published in Tomb of Lady Hao at Yinxu in Anyang, Beijing, 1980, pl. XI, figs 1 and 2; and another excavated in 1985 from a tomb site near Anyang, Henan province, published in Zhongguo qingtongqi quanjiop. cit., pl. 23.

Important Chinese Art

|
New York