3652
3652
A GOLD-SPLASHED BRONZE TRIPOD 'C'-SHAPED HANDLED INCENSE BURNER
LATE MING DYNASTY
Estimate
150,000250,000
LOT SOLD. 187,500 HKD
JUMP TO LOT
3652
A GOLD-SPLASHED BRONZE TRIPOD 'C'-SHAPED HANDLED INCENSE BURNER
LATE MING DYNASTY
Estimate
150,000250,000
LOT SOLD. 187,500 HKD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Chinese Art

|
Hong Kong

A GOLD-SPLASHED BRONZE TRIPOD 'C'-SHAPED HANDLED INCENSE BURNER
LATE MING DYNASTY
of archaistic ding form, sturdily cast with a compressed globular body resting on three cabriole legs, each with a stylised ruyi bloom to the bulging upper section, the sides flanked by a pair of C-shaped handles, each with a ribbed outer surface pierced with a lobed cartouche and ending with a defined lobed upper edge decorated with ruyi scrolls, the body bordered with eight studs, each with a central medallion wreathed by scrollwork, the base centred with a recessed cartouche enclosing an apocryphal six-character Xuande mark, the vessel decorated overall save for the interior and mark with attractive gold splashes
28.6 cm, 11 1/4  in.
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Provenance

Sotheby's London, 4th May 1984, lot 443.

Catalogue Note

Ulrich Hausmann, the scholar and collector of later Chinese bronzes, discusses Xuande reign-marked bronzes from the late Ming dynasty in his essay, 'In Search of Later Bronzes', ed. Paul Moss, Documentary Chinese Works of Art in Scholar's Taste, Sydney L. Moss Ltd, London, 1983, p. 232:

"The end of the Ming dynasty, for many a period of decadence and decline, saw a surprising variety of new creations and proves to be a much underrated period which produced fine and often highly original metalwork. Many pieces show an uninhibited display of differing designs and unusual shapes which probably make this period the most individualistic of all the later periods. Because of the diversity of appearance, sometimes rather fancy, many of these pieces are wrongly ascribed to the eighteenth century, rather than one hundred years earlier". 

The archaistic ding form of the current incense burner, which fits with Hausmann's description, is reminiscent of Wanli dated porcelain examples. See a Wanli blue and white examples of similar compressed form with handles curving upwards, from the Edward T. Chow collection, sold in these, rooms 19th May 1981, lot 422, and an example dated to 1586, sold in our New York rooms, 13th September 2017, lot 63. The current incense burner is particularly innovative with its elegant 'C'-shaped handles.

Important Chinese Art

|
Hong Kong