3617
3617
A RARE MOULDED CELADON-GLAZED ZHADOU
SEAL MARK AND PERIOD OF YONGZHENG
Estimate
1,500,0002,000,000
JUMP TO LOT
3617
A RARE MOULDED CELADON-GLAZED ZHADOU
SEAL MARK AND PERIOD OF YONGZHENG
Estimate
1,500,0002,000,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Chinese Art

|
Hong Kong

A RARE MOULDED CELADON-GLAZED ZHADOU
SEAL MARK AND PERIOD OF YONGZHENG
the compressed globular body rising from a straight foot to a wide trumpet neck with lipped rim, set atop with four loop handles, the shoulder and foot encircled by bands of moulded overlapping lappets, covered overall in a pale celadon glaze pooling at the recesses, the base inscribed with a six-character seal mark in underglaze blue
15.8 cm, 6 1/4  in.
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Provenance

Sotheby's Hong Kong, 9th November 1982, lot 230.
Christie's Hong Kong, 27th April 1997, lot 722.

Catalogue Note

This vase exudes an air of serene elegance through its luminous celadon glaze and seemingly simple form. It encapsulates the Yongzheng Emperor’s admiration for celebrated wares of the past and his penchant for contemporary designs, which resulted in a piece that is both familiar and innovative. While its form derives from archaic bronze wine vessels, zun, the bands of moulded chrysanthemum petals on the neck, shoulder and above the foot were an innovation of the Yongzheng reign.

A symbol of autumn and of the 9th month of the year, the chrysanthemum flower provided much inspiration to potters and craftsmen from as early as the Song dynasty (960-1279). Bands of moulded chrysanthemum petals are known on vases of the preceding Kangxi reign (r. 1662-1722), although on these wares they are ubiquitously found above the foot. The Yongzheng Emperor must have found this motif particularly appealing, as evidenced by the numerous porcelain wares that feature this design. Hajni Elias in ‘In the path of Tao Qian: “Chrysanthemum” wares of the Yongzheng emperor’, Arts of Asia, May-June 2015, pp. 72-85, discusses these wares and suggests that they may reveal the Emperor’s admiration for Tao Qian (365-427), one of China’s most famous poets. Having retired from his official position in 405, Tao Qian’s humble and modest life in tune with nature embodied the Daoist ideal of retirement that resonated not only among scholar-officials but also with the Yongzheng Emperor, who was a devout Daoist.

The small loop handles on the interior of the mouth make this piece unusual and suggest it may have been used as a hanging basket. While no other closely related example appears to have been published, a line drawing of a vase of this type but from the Qianlong period, is illustrated in Geng Baochang, Ming Qing ciqi jianding [Appraisal of Ming and Qing porcelain], Hong Kong, 1993, pl. 452, no. 3.

Important Chinese Art

|
Hong Kong