127
127
A RARE AND FINELY CARVED WHITE JADE 'BAT' MARRIAGE BOWL
QING DYNASTY, 18TH CENTURY
Estimate
500,000700,000
LOT SOLD. 1,500,000 HKD
JUMP TO LOT
127
A RARE AND FINELY CARVED WHITE JADE 'BAT' MARRIAGE BOWL
QING DYNASTY, 18TH CENTURY
Estimate
500,000700,000
LOT SOLD. 1,500,000 HKD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Chinese Art from the Collection of Sir Quo-Wei Lee II

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Hong Kong

A RARE AND FINELY CARVED WHITE JADE 'BAT' MARRIAGE BOWL
QING DYNASTY, 18TH CENTURY
with rounded sides supported on four feet worked in the form of lotus blooms and rising to an everted cusped rim, the vessel flanked by a pair of handles, each rendered as a bat with outstretched wings resting on the rim and suspending a loose ring, the exterior decorated in low relief with a pair of bats rendered with archaistic scrollwork, below shou medallions enclosed within ruyi bands bordering the rim, the stone of an even white colour with faint icy inclusions, wood stand
17.6 cm, 6 7/8  in.
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Catalogue Note

Carved from a fine white boulder, the evenness of tone and translucency of which is highlighted in the broad plain surfaces, this marriage bowl is notable for its the intricacy of its unusual feet, carefully worked in the form of lotus blooms. The winged bats forming these handles are auspicious emblems of long life.

Marriage bowls were popular during the Qing period and were often carved with a variety of auspicious motifs which offered blessings and good wishes upon a marital union. A wide variety of marriage bowls was produced with a large number of traditional auspicious motifs employed in the decoration. Examples with surfaces left similarly plain or only minimally carved, and flanked by winged dragon handles, include one decorated with a spray of lingzhi, wannianqing (Chinese evergreen) and a cluster of berries, sold in these rooms, 8th April 2010, lot 1869. Compare also a marriage bowl similarly modelled with an everted rim, but the handles in the form of lingzhi, from the collection of Klaus D. von Oertzen, illustrated in Sydney Howard Hansford, Jade. Essence of Hills and Streams, London, 1969, pl. D31; and another, but the body undecorated and the handles in the form of bats and lotus, illustrated in Robert Kleiner, Chinese Jades from the Collection of Alan and Simone Hartman, Hong Kong, 1996, pl. 87.

Important Chinese Art from the Collection of Sir Quo-Wei Lee II

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Hong Kong