117
117
A SUPERB WHITE JADE RETICULATED 'BAJIXIANG' BOWL AND COVER, LIAN
QING DYNASTY, QIANLONG PERIOD
Estimate
2,000,0003,000,000
LOT SOLD. 4,000,000 HKD
JUMP TO LOT
117
A SUPERB WHITE JADE RETICULATED 'BAJIXIANG' BOWL AND COVER, LIAN
QING DYNASTY, QIANLONG PERIOD
Estimate
2,000,0003,000,000
LOT SOLD. 4,000,000 HKD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Chinese Art from the Collection of Sir Quo-Wei Lee II

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Hong Kong

A SUPERB WHITE JADE RETICULATED 'BAJIXIANG' BOWL AND COVER, LIAN
QING DYNASTY, QIANLONG PERIOD
with deep rounded sides resting on five short splayed cusped feet, the rim bordered with a wide flat cusped rim finely reticulated with sixteen cartouches enclosing the bajixiang emblems alternating with stylised beribboned motifs, the domed cover surmounted by a large finial worked in the form of a pierced floral bloom with veins incised to the petals, further surrounded by a lappet border, all above a raised band encircling the rim, the lustrous stone of an even white colour with white veins, wood stand
16 cm, 6 1/4  in.
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Catalogue Note

Crafted from a boulder of luminous white tone and accentuated by exuberant carved decoration in openwork, the present bowl and cover testifies the pursuit of harmonious beauty and adroit draughtsmanship in jade carvings during the Qianlong period.

Bowls and covers of this form, also known as lian, served as vessels to carry grooming tools and cosmetics in ancient China. In the Qing imperial court, such bowls were often fashioned from wood, and either adorned with auspicious carved decoration or inlaid with jade. Jade bowls as such would have been a testament to the owner’s family status and wealth, and sometimes formed part of a lady’s dowry.

A bowl and cover in the Palace Museum, Beijing, of similar form and also adorned with a pronounced everted rim, is illustrated in The Complete Collection of Treasures from the Palace Museum. Jadeware (III), Hong Kong, 1995, pl. 198. Noteworthy is that the majority of the surface of the present bowl has been left plain and undecorated, this treatment is probably intentional to draw attention to the natural beauty and even stone colour of the present bowl, which excels that of the Palace Museum example.

Compare a bowl and cover of similar form but carved with dragons, illustrated in Robert Kleiner, Chinese Jades from the Collection of Alan and Simone Hartman, Hong Kong, 1996, pl. 79; and another similarly decorated with the bajixiang but in shallow relief, sold at Christie’s Hong Kong, 27th November 2013, lot 3398.

Important Chinese Art from the Collection of Sir Quo-Wei Lee II

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Hong Kong