115
115
A FINELY CARVED WHITE JADE BOWL
MARK AND PERIOD OF QIANLONG
Estimate
300,000400,000
LOT SOLD. 875,000 HKD
JUMP TO LOT
115
A FINELY CARVED WHITE JADE BOWL
MARK AND PERIOD OF QIANLONG
Estimate
300,000400,000
LOT SOLD. 875,000 HKD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Chinese Art from the Collection of Sir Quo-Wei Lee II

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Hong Kong

A FINELY CARVED WHITE JADE BOWL
MARK AND PERIOD OF QIANLONG
superbly worked with deep rounded sides rising to a gently everted rim, supported on a neatly cut footring, the lustrous stone of an even white colour with occasional faint inclusions
14.7 cm, 5 3/4  in.
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Catalogue Note

Worked with a seemingly plain yet superbly polished surface, and complemented with a crisp outline, the current bowl is an exceptional example of both the purity of the stones and level of workmanship under the reign of the Qianlong Emperor.

The form of the bowl, with the flared rounded sides supported on a short foot, is typical of the 18th century and particularly favoured in the Qianlong period, so much so that related examples were produced in varying sizes. See one of the same size but with a very slight difference in the long character of the mark, sold in our New York rooms, 20th March 2007, lot 618; and a smaller one also sold in our New York rooms, 19th March 2007, lot 11, from the Concordia House Collection.

Compare also an unmarked pair from the Collection Cottreau, sold at Christie’s New York, 17th September 2008, lot 330; and another bowl in the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, illustrated in Michael Knight et. al., Later Chinese Jades. Ming Dynasty to Early Twentieth Century, San Francisco, 2007, pl. 113, where the authors note that the thin walls of the vessel highlighting the translucency of the material and the purity of its colour share characteristics with its porcelain prototypes (see p. 129).

Important Chinese Art from the Collection of Sir Quo-Wei Lee II

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Hong Kong