1726
1726

PROPERTY OF VARIOUS OWNERS (LOTS 1726-1727)

Currier & Ives (publisher)
"WILD DUCK SHOOTING": HAND-COLORED LITHOGRAPH 
Estimate
2,0004,000
LOT SOLD. 2,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT
1726

PROPERTY OF VARIOUS OWNERS (LOTS 1726-1727)

Currier & Ives (publisher)
"WILD DUCK SHOOTING": HAND-COLORED LITHOGRAPH 
Estimate
2,0004,000
LOT SOLD. 2,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Americana

|
New York

Currier & Ives (publisher)
"WILD DUCK SHOOTING": HAND-COLORED LITHOGRAPH 
Hand-colored lithograph, by Frances Palmer after her own painting, New York: N. Currier, 1852. Gold liner, French mat, and bird's-eye maple frame. 

sheet size (sight): 375 x 540 mm  14 3/4 x 21 1/4 in


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Provenance

Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette Americana Collection

Catalogue Note

A classic Currier & Ives hunting print by Fanny Palmer

Fanny Palmer (1812-1876) was the first woman in the United States to work as a professional artist, and to make a living with her art. She produced more Currier and Ives' prints than any other artist, and she was the only female in a business dominated by men. Painting was not considered a suitable occupation for a woman, nor, of course, was lithography. Hers was a story common for Victorian wives who were expected to keep house and be supported by their husbands. She however pursued a career in printmaking in England and later in America, virtually supporting her family as her husband sank deeper into alcoholism and then supporting it in fact when he fell to his death on a hotel stairway in 1857.

Her shooting prints show a fine understanding of the appeal the sport had for men: with their dogs, shotguns and hunting attire, wading among the reeds in a swamp with a companion. Mrs. Palmer's husband, Samuel, was fond of shooting and kept dogs, and these served as models for her hunting scenes.

Important Americana

|
New York