1657
1657

IMPORTANT AMERICAN FURNITURE FROM THE COLLECTION OF W. FORBES AND JANE RAMSEY

VERY FINE AND RARE QUEEN ANNE CARVED MAHOGANY TRAY-TOP TEA TABLE, WETHERSFIELD, CONNECTICUT, CIRCA 1760
Estimate
15,00025,000
JUMP TO LOT
1657

IMPORTANT AMERICAN FURNITURE FROM THE COLLECTION OF W. FORBES AND JANE RAMSEY

VERY FINE AND RARE QUEEN ANNE CARVED MAHOGANY TRAY-TOP TEA TABLE, WETHERSFIELD, CONNECTICUT, CIRCA 1760
Estimate
15,00025,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Americana

|
New York

VERY FINE AND RARE QUEEN ANNE CARVED MAHOGANY TRAY-TOP TEA TABLE, WETHERSFIELD, CONNECTICUT, CIRCA 1760
appears to retain the original knee returns, tray moldings are replaced.
Height 25 3/4 in by 27 3/4 in. by Depth 20 in.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

G.K.S. Bush, Inc., Washington, D.C.

Literature

G.K.S. Bush Advertisement, Magazine Antiques, vol. 128, no. 2, August 1985, p. 177;
Albert Sack, "Regionalism in early American tea tables," vol. 131, no. 1, Magazine Antiques, January 1987,p. 258, fig. 10;
Albert Sack, "Regionalism in early American tea tables," American Antiques from Israel Sack Collections: Vol. 10, (New York: 1992), p. 69, fig. 10. 

Catalogue Note

With its elegant design, fine craftsmanship and graceful proportions, this tea table reflects the perfection attained by cabinetmakers working in the Wethersfield style. The use of imported mahogany as a primary wood speaks to the prosperity of patrons in Wethersfield.

A virtually identical tea table made of cherrywood is in the collection of Bayou Bend.1 It was owned by Colonel Thomas Belden (1732-1782) of Wethersfield, who married Abigail Porter (1737-1798), daughter of Ezekial Porter (1702-1775), on August 1, 1753. Both tables similarly display a top with a heavy molded edge, a front cyma-shaped apron, side aprons with a high center arch, knee returns that are applied to the front of the apron, and slender cabriole legs ending in bowl-shaped pad feet on a truncated cone supporting pad.

A mahogany flat-top high chest of drawers and matching dressing table at the Brooklyn Museum with the same apron and leg profile were also owned by Colonel Thomas and Abigail Belden.2 All three pieces may have been part of Abigail’s dowry and correspond to a chest with drawers, dressing table, and square cherry table listed in Colonel Belden’s 1782 estate inventory.

1 See Thomas P. Kugelman and Alice K. Kugelman, Connecticut Valley Furniture (Hartford: Connecticut Historical Society Museum, 2005) p. 57, cat. 19a.
2 See ibid, cats. 18 and 19, pp. 54-57.

Important Americana

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New York