1471
1471

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF ADELAIDE DE MENIL AND EDMUND CARPENTER

THE CUTTING FAMILY EXCEPTIONAL FEDERAL POLYCHROME GRAIN PAINT-DECORATED PINE TWO-DRAWER BLANKET CHEST, SOUTH SHAFTSBURY, VERMONT, CIRCA 1820
Estimate
120,000180,000
LOT SOLD. 225,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
1471

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF ADELAIDE DE MENIL AND EDMUND CARPENTER

THE CUTTING FAMILY EXCEPTIONAL FEDERAL POLYCHROME GRAIN PAINT-DECORATED PINE TWO-DRAWER BLANKET CHEST, SOUTH SHAFTSBURY, VERMONT, CIRCA 1820
Estimate
120,000180,000
LOT SOLD. 225,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Americana

|
New York

THE CUTTING FAMILY EXCEPTIONAL FEDERAL POLYCHROME GRAIN PAINT-DECORATED PINE TWO-DRAWER BLANKET CHEST, SOUTH SHAFTSBURY, VERMONT, CIRCA 1820
appears to retain its original hand-blown glass knobs; inside of lid inscribed in graphite This was the property of Nioma Cutting and given to Florence Cutting who gave it to her brother Charles and wife, probably has been in existence since before 1800, Whittingham, Vermont.
Height 40 1/2 in. by Width 41 1/4 in. by Depth 18 1/4 in.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

The Cutting Family, Whittingham, Vermont;
Mr. Robert Ellison, New York;
Gerald Kornblau American Folk Art, New York.

Literature

Dean A. Fales, Jr., American Painted Furniture 1660-1880, (New York: E.P. Dutton, 1973), p. 233, no. 397.

Catalogue Note

With its lavish painted decoration inspired by fashionable furniture of the Federal period, this blanket chest represents the best of high style furniture made by rural craftsman in Vermont during the early 19th century. This imaginative maker enlivened the façade of a plain chest in imitation of the vibrantly grained mahogany, satinwood, flame birch, tiger maple and bird’s-eye maple veneers found on expensive furniture made in urban areas. The graphite inscription on the lid recounts its history in the Cutting family of Whittingham, Vermont, from Nioma Cutting to Florence Cutting and next to her brother, Charles Cutting. Many members of this family are buried in the Cutting Cemetery in Whittingham. The name written here may refer to Charles Cutting (1830-1888) of Whittingham, son of James Cutting (1800-1857) and his wife Cynthia Winchester (1807-1843), who married on July 11, 1824.  Charles later married Lovina Fairbanks (1838-1914).

The blanket chest is one of a group of chests made in the Shaftsbury area that share identical construction characteristics and ornamental painting in mustard, green, red, and brown. One was formerly in the collection of Leigh Keno and sold at Christie’s, Important American Furniture, Folk Art, Silver & Chinese Export, January 20, 2012, sale 2433, lot 188. Another is in the collection of the Bennington Museum in Bennington, Vermont. Three others are illustrated by Dean Fales Jr. in American Painted Furniture 1660-1880 (New York: E.P. Dutton & Company, 1972): nos. 371-3, p. 221. Two of the aforementioned examples are signed and dated 1824 by Thomas Matteson of South Shaftsbury. This group of chests is the focus of Caroline Hebb’s article “A Distinctive Group of Early Vermont Painted Furniture,” in The Magazine Antiques (September 1973): 458-461.  Recent research indicates that these inscriptions likely refer to ownership rather than a maker.1

1 Cynthia van Allen Schaffner, “Matteson Group Chests,” Encyclopedia of American Folk Art (New York: 2004): pp. 307-308.
Krashes, David. (1998) "The South Shaftsbury, Vermont, Painted Wooden Chests", Rural New England Furniture: People, Place, and Production. The Dublin Seminar for New England Folklife Annual Proceedings, 26-28 June 1998, editor Peter Benes, Boston University, pp. 226-235.

Important Americana

|
New York