2164
2164

PROPERTY OF A NEW YORK COLLECTOR

Theodore Roosevelt
TYPED LETTER SIGNED ("THEODORE ROOSEVELT") TO THE HON. RICHARD CAMPBELL ("MY DEAR JUDGE"), DOWNPLAYING HIS PROSPECTS FOR THE 1916 REPUBLICAN PRESIDENTIAL NOMINATION
Estimate
2,0003,000
JUMP TO LOT
2164

PROPERTY OF A NEW YORK COLLECTOR

Theodore Roosevelt
TYPED LETTER SIGNED ("THEODORE ROOSEVELT") TO THE HON. RICHARD CAMPBELL ("MY DEAR JUDGE"), DOWNPLAYING HIS PROSPECTS FOR THE 1916 REPUBLICAN PRESIDENTIAL NOMINATION
Estimate
2,0003,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Fine Manuscript and Printed Americana

|
New York

Theodore Roosevelt
TYPED LETTER SIGNED ("THEODORE ROOSEVELT") TO THE HON. RICHARD CAMPBELL ("MY DEAR JUDGE"), DOWNPLAYING HIS PROSPECTS FOR THE 1916 REPUBLICAN PRESIDENTIAL NOMINATION
One page (10 x 6 7/8 in.; 253 x 172 mm), Oyster Bay, Long Island, New York, 13 May 1916; light fold creases.
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Catalogue Note

Teddy Roosevelt succeeded to the presidency in the midst of the Philippine-American War, during which time he perhaps made the acquaintance of Richard Campbell, judge of the Court of First Instance of the city of Manila. He here thanks Campbell for some recent correspondence, but tempers the judge's expectation that the GOP might again choose Roosevelt as its presidential standard-bearer. 

"That’s an awfully nice letter of yours! I will see Judge Moreland as soon as possible. Now, I wish I could see you and go over this situation.

"I do not believe that the Republicans have any intention of nominating me. I only hope they will give us some man who will be the antithesis of Wilson. What a trump General Barry is!" (Thomas Henry Barry—who had earlier been appointed by President Roosevelt as commander of the Army of Cuban Occupation and Pacification and had also served as Superintendent of West Point—was at the time the commander American troops in the Philippines and China.)  

Roosevelt's 1912 third-party challenge to his former friend and vice president, William Howard Taft, put Woodrow Wilson in the White House. With the looming prospect of American involvement in the war in Europe as the central issue of the 1916 campaign, the Democrats nominated incumbent Wilson while the Republicans nominated Charles Evans Hughes of New York, then a sitting associate justice on the Supreme Court. Although the Progressive Party—popularly known as the Bull Moose party—nominated him again, Roosevelt, his disdain for Wilson even greater than before, and all too aware of the consequences of another split Republican vote, withdrew his candidacy and threw his support behind Hughes.

Fine Manuscript and Printed Americana

|
New York