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34

STANDARDS OF EXCELLENCE: THE BLEMA AND H. ARNOLD STEINBERG COLLECTION

Sam Francis
UNTITLED (COOL VIOLET)
Estimate
200,000300,000
JUMP TO LOT
34

STANDARDS OF EXCELLENCE: THE BLEMA AND H. ARNOLD STEINBERG COLLECTION

Sam Francis
UNTITLED (COOL VIOLET)
Estimate
200,000300,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Contemporary Curated

|
New York

Sam Francis
1923 - 1994
UNTITLED (COOL VIOLET)

Executed in 1956-57, this work is identified with the interim identification number of SF57-045 in consideration for the forthcoming Sam Francis: Catalogue Raisonné of Unique Works on Paper. This information is subject to change as scholarship continues by the Sam Francis Foundation.

Provenance

Martha Jackson Gallery, New York
Harris B. Steinberg Collection, New York
Galerie Beyeler, Basel
John Berggruen Gallery, San Francisco
Acquired from the above by the present owner in June 1983

Exhibited

New York, Martha Jackson Gallery, Sam Francis: Watercolors and Around the Blues, November - December 1957, cat. no. 3, n.p., (text)
New York, Horace Mann School, A Half-Century of American Art, 1959
Boulder, Henderson Museum Gallery of Art, University of Colorado, Watermedia Painting, July - September 1970, n.p., illustrated
Basel, Galerie Beyeler, Sam Francis: Ölbilder und Gouachen, June 1977, cat. no. 11, n.p. (text)
Musée d’art contemporain de Montreal, L’oeil du collectionneur, October 1996 - January 1997, p. 58 (text)

Literature

Karen Thomson, Ed., The Blema and H. Arnold Steinberg Collection, Montreal 2015, cat. no. 30, p. 37, illustrated in color

Catalogue Note

"Blue had become a signature color for Francis [...] the multiple gradations of blue can be traced to several sources, including poetry [...] Francis' experience of Venice, especially the Byzantine mosaics at Torcello, as well as the light of the sky and sea permeating the city. He surely was also struck by the blue vault of heaven in Giotto's frescoes at Padua. Always inspired by Matisse, Francis particularly focused on Matisse's extensive work with blues in the early 1950s. But more than anything there was the ongoing impact of late Monet— 'I made the late Monet pure,' he said—redolent with blue, especially in the Grandes Nymphéas at the Orangerie in Paris [reopened after the war in 1953]." William C. Agee in: "Sam Francis: Coming of Age in the Mother City" in: Exh. Cat., New York, L&M Arts, Sam Francis: 1953-1959, 2009, p. 14

Contemporary Curated

|
New York